Tag Archives: TRL

First public autonomous car trials begin in Oxford

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The public trials with a fleet of six autonomous cars will take place on roads in the UK city of Oxford.

City environments

The trials will demonstrate autonomous driving in a variety of urban and city environments and will develop engagement models with local authorities and communities to help them prepare for the future launch of autonomous vehicle services.

According to the consortium, the development brings the deployment of commercial autonomous vehicles in the UK one step closer.

The consortium, part-funded by the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAV) and delivered in partnership with Innovate UK, is using a combination of advanced simulations and on-road demonstrations to help accelerate and scale the deployment and adoption of autonomous vehicles.

The Government-backed R&D project will run until Autumn 2021 with live tests undertaken in three major UK cities.

A fleet of six Ford Mondeo vehicles, enabled by Oxbotica to be capable of Level 4 autonomous driving, will complete a nine-mile round trip from Oxford Parkway station to Oxford’s main train station. Trials will be run at all times of day and night, allowing Oxbotica’s autonomous vehicles to experience a range of traffic scenarios from morning commutes to school runs, in a range of weather conditions.

“The first live on-road public trials mark a key landmark for Project Endeavour as we work with local authorities and members of the public in London, Oxford and other major UK cities to shape the future of mobility”

Launched in September 2019, the project has brought together Oxbotica, a global leader in autonomous software, urban innovators DG Cities and Immense, a transport simulation company. Ahead of the public trials, three new consortium partners have joined Project Endeavour: the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), the British Standards Institution (BSI) and Oxfordshire County Council.

“Trials of Level 4 vehicles are an important milestone, keeping the UK at the head of the field in bringing the benefits of this technology into mainstream use,” said Camilla Fowler, head of automation at TRL.

“These exciting trials, and what we learn about assuring safety and encouraging interoperability, will open up new opportunities for many more research demonstrations across the UK, which are the forerunners to the full-scale public trials so eagerly awaited.”

Safety assurance

The trio of new partners will focus on the development of a new safety assurance assessment scheme against PAS 1881 standard for public autonomous trials, helping inspire trust and define a consistent approach to safety that will enable future deployments to happen efficiently without slowing down the rate of innovation.

“The first live on-road public trials mark a key landmark for Project Endeavour as we work with local authorities and members of the public in London, Oxford and other major UK cities to shape the future of mobility,” added Dr Graeme Smith, senior vice president at Oxbotica and Project Endeavour consortium director.

“Alongside our valued partners, we’re making autonomous vehicle services an everyday reality, right here in the UK.”

Project Endeavour builds on the Driven consortium, which demonstrated the capabilities of a fleet of self-driving vehicles in Oxfordshire’s and London’s challenging and complex urban environment.

Source: Smart Cities World

O2 plans rollout of 5G connectivity for world’s most advanced urban testbed for self-driving vehicles

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  • London’s Smart Mobility Living Lab (SMLL) aims to put the UK in the lead to test and validate self-driving car technologies.
  • Experts from TRL, DG Cities, Cisco, Loughborough University and O2 provide critical services enabling trials of driverless vehicles and smart transport systems at Royal Borough of Greenwich and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.
  • O2’s involvement supports operator’s commitment to support businesses looking to explore the potential of 5G in the mobility sector.

O2 has signed an agreement to provide 5G connectivity for the testing of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) in the world’s most advanced urban testbed, the Smart Mobility Living Lab (SMLL) in London.

O2’s 3.4GHz 5G-ready spectrum will enable car manufacturers, self-driving technology companies, start-ups as well as other private and public organisations involved in the transport ecosystem to test both vehicle to vehicle (V2V) and vehicle to road communications (V2X) in a real-world environment.

SMLL is a government backed CAV testbed based in the Royal Borough of Greenwich and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, created with the aim of building safer, more intelligent and better joined-up transport systems. It comprises world leading expertise from across the transport and technology sectors including TRL, Cisco, DG Cities, London Legacy Development Corporation, Cubic Transportation Systems and Loughborough University. O2 has now agreed to collaborate with SMLL to provide 5G connectivity to the testbed.

5G’s role in supporting CAV and intelligent transport systems

Many transport experts believe 5G is the key to unlocking the potential of self-driving vehicles’ potential. There are three stand-out reasons for this – the extra speed of 5G, its ability to connect with many more devices at once, and a far lower latency, meaning data sent between two 5G devices is almost instantaneous.

The high capacity of 5G also allows for vehicles to transmit large amounts of data, including 4K video, to intelligent cloud-based transport systems, which are expected to improve road safety and help traffic authorities to monitor and manage traffic flow.

Brendan O’Reilly, O2’s Chief Technology Officer, said, “At O2 we’re determined to help businesses of all sizes realise the potential of fifth-generation mobile technology. We know that the transport sector is going to be one of the key beneficiaries of 5G – and that the technology has the potential to reduce traffic congestion, as well as making journeys safer and more enjoyable. That’s why we’re excited to be working with the teams at the Smart Mobility Living Lab, who are driving forward our understanding how this next generation technology will fundamentally change the fabric of the cities in which we live and work as well as creating entirely new methods of travel.”

Paul Campion, CEO of TRL, said“5G is a technology that supports a successful rollout of self-driving cars in the UK. Smart Mobility Living Lab (SMLL) research shows that over a third of industry leaders from the transport, technology and automotive industries think investment in strengthening the UK’s digital infrastructure is a key step for making self-driving cars commercially available in the UK. By working with industry leader O2, we are ensuring that SMLL is not just a real-world testing environment for self-driving cars today; we are future-proofing the testbed so that we can accelerate our customers’ research and development programmes.”

Trevor Dorling, Managing Director of DG Cities, said: “Connected and autonomous vehicles are an emerging technology with the potential to address some of the key challenges cities face. The ‘connected’, in connected and autonomous vehicles is critically important as it enables advanced safety features such as vulnerable road user alerts or dangerous intersection warnings to work, making city streets safer. 5G underpins these use cases and offers further benefits to people and businesses. This latest collaboration with O2 and SMLL will enable us to better understand the potential applications of this new technology.

O2 continues to power UK’s self-driving trials

O2’s Smart Cities report highlighted a number of compelling ways in which 5G can help the UK economy. This included how a 5G-enabled road management system, able to respond to traffic pressures at unprecedented speeds, will reduce the time motorists spend stuck in traffic by 10%, save the economy £880 million a year, and reduce CO2 emissions by 370,000 metric tonnes per year.

In July, O2 announced its ‘Smart Ambulance’ trial to revolutionise patient treatment and reduce hospital numbers. The trial, which began this month, involves equipping a standard ambulance with state-of-the-art devices and connectivity, transforming the vehicle into a unique remote consultation room. In June, O2 also announced that it is preparing to test satellite safety systems for 5G driverless cars in Oxfordshire in partnership with the European and British space agencies. This follows the news earlier this year that O2 will use its 5G network to power autonomous vehicle testing at the Millbrook Proving Ground in Bedfordshire.

SMLL uses public and private roads in London. In doing so it has created the most advanced urban testing environment for autonomous transport systems and the opportunities presented by the latest 5G technologies from O2.

Source: 02

Tiredness alarms ‘to be forced on drivers’

Cars in the future could sound an alarm or automatically slow down or stop if the drive is not focused on the road, or even flash hazard lights to warn other motorists.

In the future, cars could sound an alarm or stop automatically if the driver is not focused on the road

CAMERAS that monitor a driver’s gaze and sound an alarm if they are looking at a phone or falling asleep could be a legal safety requirement in new cars within a few years, it was claimed this weekend.

European Commission officials are preparing a raft of new safety proposals for car manufacturers and are expected to include measures to cut the number of accidents caused by drivers who are distracted or tired.

Experts this weekend predicted that the measures, due to be unveiled next month, could be among the most significant safety advances since manufacturers began fitting airbags in the early 1990s.

A landmark report compiled for the commission by Britain’s Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) found that technology which recognises when a driver is distracted or drowsy is now “cost effective” and can be included in future EU safety regulations.

Source: Mark Hookham. Sunday Times

 

TRL develops eCall test proposals ahead of mandatory rollout in 2018

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TRL, the UK’s Transport Research Laboratory, has developed proposals for technical requirements and test procedures for the European type-approval of eCall in-vehicle systems. The draft proposals, which were developed for the European Commission, provide recommendations on the safety requirements for eCall systems in preparation of the mandatory European roll-out in 2018.

Following the publication of eCall Regulation (EU) 2015/758 in May 2015, TRL was commissioned by the European Commission to develop draft proposals for the delegated acts of the regulation, which will set out the detailed technical requirements and test procedures for eCall systems. The proposals seek to set minimum standards for eCall systems in Europe to ensure that all systems work as intended, even after a severe collision.

As part of the project, TRL analysed and developed test requirements and procedures for seven technical aspects including: resistance of eCall systems to severe crashes (sled test); full scale impact test; crash resistance of audio equipment; co-existence of third party services (TPS); automatic triggering mechanism; in-vehicle system self-test and privacy and data protection.

Twelve telematics units were used for experiments in the dedicated deceleration sled test element and operability verification test procedures, which set out to measure the mechanical resistance of eCall systems to severe crashes at accelerations up to 100 g. These units were designed, produced and provided to TRL by Stadium United Wireless and included the telematics control module (ECU), containing the printed circuit board with GSM and GNSS modules, SIM card holder and SIM card, capacitors and other electronic components.

The test programme was designed and carried out by TRL using its in-house high-energy test sled facility, which uses a bungee propulsion system and deceleration elements to achieve severe deceleration levels. A physical and electronic inspection, via current consumption and GPS/GSM functionality, was carried out by Stadium United Wireless at the end of the tests which concluded that all samples remained undamaged, even after being subjected to a deceleration of over 100 g.

Matthias Seidl, Senior Vehicle Safety Researcher at TRL, commented: “Our in-house test sled allows us to simulate collisions with peak decelerations considerably higher than most current vehicle tests. These high levels are necessary to ensure that eCall systems are still able to make an emergency call, even after a severe crash.”

“The results of the tests enabled us to develop stringent, but practical, test procedures for eCall systems. This will ensure that poor system designs, which could jeopardise the safety of road users, will not be allowed onto the European market. The results can also be used to help shape the technical discussions at an international level in order to ensure that the same level of protection is provided to road users around the world. In fact, the suggested European standards have also been proposed to the United Nations working group on automatic emergency call systems.”

The eCall Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2015/758) empowers the European Commission (EC) to adopt delegated acts defining “the detailed technical requirements and tests for the EC type-approval of vehicles in respect of their 112-based eCall in-vehicle systems and the EC type-approval of 112-based eCall in-vehicle systems, components and separate technical units” and delegated and implementing acts regarding privacy and data protection.

The TRL report, entitled ‘eCall Phase 2 – Technical requirements and test procedures for the type-approval of in-vehicle systems’, can be downloaded free of charge here.

 

Source: TFL