Tag Archives: Tracker

96% OF CAR OWNERS VULNERABLE TO A RELAY ATTACK BY CRIMINALS TRACKER urges motorists to safeguard their keys to prevent theft

tracker

According to the latest figures from TRACKER (part of the Tantalum Corporation), 96% of motorists it surveyed are at risk of having their car stolen by criminals using the latest theft technique – a relay attack.   In 2016, 66% of TRACKER’s stolen vehicle recovery customer thefts’ were committed by way of a ‘relay attack’, confirming just how prevalent this crime has become.

Not only are so many people vulnerable to the risk of theft via this means, 25% of those surveyed by TRACKER said they leave their car keys somewhere in the hallway overnight.  This is the most common room in the house for thieves to target to intercept an electronic car key’s signal, and it’s where the signal is likely to be strongest because of its proximity to the vehicle itself.

A ‘relay attack’ is a new method used by car thieves, which involves two criminals working together using electronic signal relay devices.  Just recently, CCTV footage obtained by West Midlands Police of a theft of a Mercedes2, confirmed just how easily criminals can use a device to receive the car key signal from inside the victim’s home, transferring that signal to the second box, which is placed next to the car. The car’s system is tricked into thinking the key is there, allowing thieves to unlock the vehicle and drive away within minutes.

The TRACKER survey shows that 13% of people leave their keys on the hallway table, which is as good as leaving the door open for thieves. A quarter (25%) leave their keys in a dedicated key pot or on a key hook elsewhere downstairs, whilst 15% put them in a drawer in a downstairs room.  Although putting keys in a drawer means they are out of sight should an opportunistic burglar be on the prowl, it won’t protect them from a relay attack should a techno savvy car thief be lurking outside.

“We’re seeing more and more of these relay attacks taking place across the country,” explains Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER. “It’s clear from our survey that many people are unintentionally leaving themselves vulnerable to these kinds of attack, by putting their keys in easy reach of  relay devices.

“The good news is there are simple precautions people can take. Whilst the relay devices can receive signals through walls, doors and windows, metal is its enemy, so putting keys in a metal tin or the microwave is a cost effective way to thwart the criminals.  Alternatively, invest in a metallised signal blocking pouch, such as a Faraday wallet, which is designed to shield electronic keys from relay attacks.

“It’s also worth remembering that vehicle security should be multi-layered and shouldn’t just rely on the keyless security system. Physical barriers, such as crook locks and wheel clamps will deter thieves. And whilst investing in a tracking device won’t stop a car being stolen, it can significantly increase the chances of police locating it and returning it to the rightful owner. This, plus added vigilance, dramatically contributes to keeping thieves at bay.”

Unlike other devices, TRACKER’s unique technology can locate stolen vehicles anywhere, even when they are hidden in a garage or shipping container. TRACKER has been reuniting car lovers with their vehicles for nearly 25 years, and it’s this expertise which makes TRACKER the leader in stolen vehicle recovery. TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery systems work like an electronic homing device. A covert transmitter is hidden in one of several dozen places around the vehicle. There is no visible aerial, so the thief won’t even know it’s there.

Where do you typically leave your car keys at night?

1.     In the hallway – either on a table or in a bag or coat pocket                                25%

2.     A dedicated key pot or key hook elsewhere in the house                                   25%

3.     In a draw downstairs                                                                                           16%

4.     In my bedroom                                                                                                       12%

5.     A combination of 1-4 above                                                                                  10%

6.     Somewhere in the house – I usually have to hunt for them in the morning          8%

7.     A metal container to ensure it is protected from a relay attack                            4%

 

TRACKER’S TOP TIPS ON HOW TO AVOID VEHICLE THEFT

Check it’s locked. Always double check that your car is physically secure and alarmed, when using keyless locking systems. Wait to see the flashing hazard lights confirm it’s locked. Thieves frequently lie in wait and block locking signals as owners walk away from their cars.

Keep keys out of sight.  Leaving keys in the hallway or on the kitchen worktop means thieves can break in and swipe them quickly, before driving off in your car. Put them in a drawer or out of sight in a bag, at least.

 

Block electronic key fob signals.  A faraday wallet is designed to shield electronic car keys from relay attacks – a new theft technique that involves extending a key fob’s signal by relaying it from one device to another.   But you could also put them in a metal tin or microwave overnight to protect them from a relay attack.

Add layers of security.  Physical barriers can be effective in deterring thieves. Consider adding a crook lock or wheel clamp to your car. Alternatively, a driveway parking post or just locked gates can stop thieves in their tracks.

Install a ‘ghost immobiliser’.  For another layer of protection, add a secondary barrier to your car’s factory fitted immobiliser by having a unique access code to start your car.

Invest in a tracking device. A tracking device won’t stop your vehicle being stolen, but it significantly increases chances of police recovering and returning it, if thieves do take it.

Source: Tracker

 

Positioning Universal and Sequans Partner on LTE for IoT GPS Tracker Devices

sequans-communications-sa-logo

First PUI 4G pui-logoLTE tracker now available for automotive applications

SAN DIEGO, Calif., and PARIS, France  July 25, 2017  Sequans Communications S.A. (NYSE: SQNS) and Positioning Universal (PUI), IoT device maker and platform company, announced a partnership to bring new IoT and GPS tracking devices to market, the first of which is an automotive tracker, now available for customers using US LTE networks.  The PUI FJ1000 Series Automotive LTE Tracker features LTE connectivity and GPS, and is based on Sequans’ Calliope LTE Cat 1 chipset.

“Tracker devices are the quintessential IoT application and automotive trackers are in especially high demand,” said Mark Wells, CEO of Positioning Universal. “We are very pleased to introduce our new FJ1000 series LTE tracker to the market and to collaborate with Sequans, the leader in LTE for IoT chips, to make it happen.”

PUI’s FJ1000 Series LTE Automotive Tracker is a power-efficient LTE and GPS wireless modem that transmits important GPS data, such as status information, ignition events, and trip activity via the always on and everywhere available LTE nationwide network. Trip locations are provided for up to 5-second locations for precise route lines, and status information is reported for heartbeats, boot events, GPS status, acceleration-based events, and more. The tracker operates on standard automotive 12V and 24V electrical systems and includes advanced power management and an optional backup battery system that enables the device to continue active tracking for up to 36 hours, even when disconnected from power.

“PUI’s new automotive tracker combines essential features for vehicle telematics and fleet management customers to take full advantage of GPS and LTE-enabled tracking,” said Georges Karam, Sequans CEO. “We are very pleased to collaborate with PUI to bring this valuable new automotive tracker to market.”

PUI is using Sequans VZ120Q and US130Q modules that support LTE bands 2, 4, 12, and 13 and are based on Sequans Calliope LTE Platform, an-IoT-optimized chipset solution designed specifically for LTE Cat 1 applications needing up to 10 Mbps of throughput, providing great application flexibility for PUI’s automotive tracker. Calliope comprises baseband and RF, an integrated IoT applications processor running Sequans’ carrier-proven LTE protocol stack, an IMS client, and a comprehensive software package for over-the-air device management and packet routing.

The new PUI FJ1000 Series LTE Tracker will be on display at Mobile World Congress Americas, September 12-14, in San Francisco, in the North Hall, in PUI’s booth N.213 and in Sequans’ booth N.501.  PUI will also be demonstrating its open IoT platform, which allows customers to develop customized tracker solutions using PUI’s platforms, tools and capabilities.

About Positioning Universal

Positioning Universal Inc. is a San Diego, California-based IoT hardware provider that is fully integrated to cloud-based end-to-end IoT and asset management capabilities with a growing global presence, providing solutions in USA, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Canada, Asia, Eastern Europe, Africa, and more. For more information, visit www.positioninguniversal.com.

Media Contact: Darlene Fenn COHR Consulting 858-518-3702, dfenn@cohrconsulting.com

About Sequans Communications

Sequans Communications S.A. (NYSE: SQNS) is a leading provider of single-mode 4G LTE semiconductor solutions for the Internet of Things (IoT) and a wide range of broadband data devices. Founded in 2003, Sequans has developed and delivered seven generations of 4G technology and its chips are certified and shipping in 4G networks around the world. Today, Sequans offers two LTE product lines: StreamrichLTE™, optimized for broadband devices, including CPE, mobile and portable routers, and high-performance IoT devices, and StreamliteLTE™, optimized for lower data rate and narrowband IoT devices.  Sequans is based in Paris, France with additional offices in the United States, United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Singapore, Sweden, Taiwan, South Korea, and China. Visit Sequans online at www.sequans.comwww.facebook.com/sequanswww.twitter.com/sequans

SOURCE: Sequans Communications S.A.

Over Half A Million Pounds Of Stolen Light Commercial Vehicles Recovered In 2016

tracker

 

  • Light Commercial Vehicles (LCV) worth over half a million pounds were recovered by TRACKER in 2016
  • The average LCV value was £19,333
  • 44% of the vehicles were stolen using the owner’s keys and 44% of them were stolen and recovered in London
  • The Ford Transit accounted for over 50% of all LCVs recovered by TRACKER

According to the latest figures from TRACKER (part of the Tantalum Corporation,) Light Commercial Vehicles (LCVs) made up over half a million pounds of the overall recoveries in 2016. The Ford Transit was the most popular van stolen last year and accounted for over half of the LCV recoveries made by TRACKER. The stolen vehicle recovery (SVR) expert is urging business owners to ramp up the security on their vans.

The latest figures reveal the average value of vans stolen and recovered was £19,333, with 44% being stolen using the owner’s keys. Furthermore, London was the hot spot for van thieves in 2016 as 44% were stolen in the Capital.

Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER, comments, “A high number of vans are stolen in the UK every year, and our latest figures highlight just how much of an impact this can have on businesses. Nearly five and a half thousand Ford Transits were stolen in the UK last year, which is a thousand more than the previous year. Additionally, Mercedes Sprinters are proving to be equally as attractive to organised criminal gangs.

“The theft of a van can hit companies really hard regardless of their size, such as the loss of valuable tools and equipment, loss of business and costs associated with hiring a replacement, so van operators really need to consider protecting their vehicles with TRACKER’s market leading SVR technology.”

Unlike other stolen vehicle recovery devices, TRACKER’s unique technology can locate vehicles anywhere, even when they are hidden in a garage or shipping container. TRACKER has been reuniting car lovers with their vehicles for nearly 25 years, and it’s this expertise which makes TRACKER the leader in stolen vehicle recovery.

“Although using a TRACKER may not stop vehicles from being stolen in the first place, it dramatically increases the likelihood of it being recovered before it’s too late,” concludes Andy Barrs.

Source: Tracker

Wifi and cloud based applications bring a new wave of car hacking

Wifi and cloud based applications bring a new wave of car hacking

tracker

Security researchers* have exposed security vulnerability in Mitsubishi Outlander hybrid cars that allowed hackers to remotely turn off the car’s alarm system, control the lights and drain the battery. Stolen vehicle recovery expert, TRACKER (part of the Tantalum Corporation), which has been a longstanding campaigner against vulnerable vehicle security systems, warns that in-car wifi and cloud based applications present a wide range of opportunities for thieves to attack, making it even more difficult  for modern vehicles to be completely secure from determined hackers.

Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER, and a former Chief Superintendent for South Yorkshire Police, Andy Barrs says, “The latest security breach, involving the Mitsubishi Outlander, demonstrates just how advanced thieves are in developing their tactics to tackle new technology. Although manufacturers are constantly developing new immobiliser technology, designed to outpace criminals and make new models significantly more secure, thieves will continue to look for new ways to outwit them, including exploiting telematics and mobile connectivity.

“Of late, standalone key programming theft tools have been making news headlines, but over the next decade, cloud-based theft tools that simply require internet connection are anticipated to dominate.  By hacking this type of technology thieves are able to easily target the most desirable models and steal to order, requiring no tools to enter or drive the vehicle away.”

TRACKER’s stolen vehicle recovery (SVR) device is the only solution used by all the UK’s police forces; it works like an electronic homing device.  A covert transmitter is hidden in one of several dozen places around the vehicle, and there is no visible aerial, so the thief won’t even know it’s there.   Uniquely, TRACKER combines GSM, GPS and VHF technology, which means it is able to locate a stolen vehicle anywhere, even when if it is hidden in a garage or shipping container.  It’s this matchless combination of technology that makes TRACKER’s SVR solutions resilient to ‘jamming’ – another commonly used tactic by car thieves – creating the most robust stolen car tracking and locating unit available.

Source: Tracker

Prestige cars no longer passé with car thieves

tracker

A whopping 32% of all stolen vehicles recovered by TRACKER in 2016 were valued at less than £5,000.  The age, mileage and even brand of a vehicle doesn’t appear to matter to vehicle thieves as much as motorists may think, which should serve as a stark warning to the average car owner, advises stolen vehicle recovery expert, TRACKER.

Interestingly, confirming the demise of the prestige car as the thieves’ number one target, the average value of cars stolen and recovered by TRACKER in 2016 was just over £16,000, down from over £19,000 in 2015 – a 13% drop in value.  Over £11.5 million worth of stolen vehicles were returned by TRACKER to their rightful owners last year, a notable 10% year-on-year increase for TRACKER.

Whilst the most expensive car recovered by TRACKER in 2016 was a Mercedes-Benz G63 AMG worth £120,000, the reality is that less than 1% of stolen vehicles TRACKER recovers are worth between £75,000-£120,000.

Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER and a former Chief Superintendent for South Yorkshire Police, comments, “Understandably, many vehicle owners think that organised car thieves typically target high end prestige cars. Yet our data tells us that criminals continue to target more affordable, popular brands, such as Ford, Vauxhall, and VW models. Indeed, these were stolen in record numbers last year, with the lowest value car stolen and recovered being a VW Golf worth £400.

“If people think their car isn’t worth enough for thieves to steal it, think again. 3 out of 4 stolen cars we recovered were worth less than £20,000.  The message for all motorists is to protect their car from thieves or as we say at TRACKER – if you love it, track it!”

Unlike other devices, TRACKER’s unique technology can locate stolen vehicles anywhere, even when they are hidden in a garage or shipping container. TRACKER has been reuniting car lovers with their vehicles for over 20 years, and it’s this expertise which makes TRACKER the leader in stolen vehicle recovery. TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery systems work like an electronic homing device. A covert transmitter is hidden in one of several dozen places around the vehicle. There is no visible aerial, so the thief won’t even know it’s there.

London remains top spot for stolen and recovered cars in 2016

tracker

According to the latest stolen vehicle recovery (SVR) figures for 2016 from TRACKER (part of the Tantalum Corporation), London continues to top the list of regions where cars were most stolen and recovered. Essex comes in second, ousting Greater Manchester which moves down to seventh place.

The most popular car among London’s thieves is the BMW X5, which also hit the most popular stolen and recovered lists in Essex, the West Midlands and Merseyside; the BMW X5 was the most stolen and recovered car of 2016 overall.  The most expensive stolen car that was recovered in 2016 was a Mercedes Benz from London worth £120,000.  TRACKER’s figures also reveal that a Mercedes C Class worth £2,000 was the least expensive car stolen in London in 2016, proving that thieves don’t just target the cars of the rich and famous.

“London is the theft and recovery hot spot for the fifth year running, proving that the Capital is a major draw for criminals,” explains Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER. “However, there have been some interesting shifts in regional theft and recovery activity when we compare 2016 to 2015.  Leicestershire – which tied 10th with Lancashire in 2015 – and Hertfordshire have both disappeared from the 2016 league table and South Yorkshire makes an entry at 9th place. West Yorkshire jumps up the table to 5th place, joining Kent. Surrey, like London, remains static at 6th place.”

“What’s also important to note is that the average value of vehicles stolen and recovered dropped to £16,436, down from over £19,000 in 2015. Thieves also target more affordable, yet popular brands, such as Ford, Vauxhall, and VW models which are stolen in even greater numbers.

“Although a TRACKER device won’t prevent a vehicle from being stolen, it’s clear from our figures that they do increase the chances of it being recovered and returned by the police. We continue to work closely with all UK police forces and in 2016 we assisted with 62 arrests, helping to close the net on the criminals.”

Unlike other devices, TRACKER’s unique technology can locate stolen vehicles anywhere, even when they are hidden in a garage or shipping container. TRACKER has been reuniting car lovers with their vehicles for over 20 years, and it’s this expertise which makes TRACKER the leader in stolen vehicle recovery.

TRACKER’S TOP TEN REGIONS WHERE CARS ARE STOLEN AND RECOVERED
2016 2015
1. London and Greater London 1. London and Greater London
2. Essex 2. Greater Manchester
3. West Midlands 3. West Midlands
4 & 5. = West Yorkshire/Kent 4. Essex
6. Surrey 5. Kent
7. Greater Manchester 6. Surrey
8. Merseyside 7. West Yorkshire
9. South Yorkshire 8. Hertfordshire
10. Lancashire 9. Merseyside
10. = Lancashire/Leicestershire
Source; Tracker

BMW X5 reclaims reign as most ‘stolen and recovered’ car in 2016 reports TRACKER

tracker

According to the latest figures from TRACKER (part of the Tantalum Corporation), the prestige 4×4, BMW X5, reclaimed its place as the most stolen and recovered vehicle in 2016.  BMW, Range Rover and Mercedes-Benz models dominated the 2016 TRACKER Top 10 Most Stolen and Recovered league table, but the Land Rover Defender entered the league for the first time, confirming a rise in demand since its production stopped in January of last year.  Audi falls out of the league table for the first time since 2011*.

2015 was the first time in the last 8 years when the BMW X5 didn’t hit the top spot; it was ousted by the Range Rover Sport which returned to second place in 2016. Four BMW models feature in the 2016 table, with the BMW M3 making a return appearance at third place; it dropped out of the table last year. The Range Rover Autobiography moves up to seventh place and the Range Roger Vogue drops to eighth.

In 2016, TRACKER reported a year-on-year increase of over 10% in the total volume of stolen cars it recovered; over £11.5 million worth of stolen vehicles were returned to their rightful owners. Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER explains, “Our latest figures reveal a shift in the most desirable makes and models that thieves are stealing to order, but 4x4s remain the most popular type of vehicles for thieves.  However, with the Mercedes C and E Class sitting in fourth and fifth, respectively, premium executive cars are also proving to be a target for criminals.”

The most expensive stolen car recovered by TRACKER in 2016 was a Mercedes-Benz G63 AMG worth £120,000, followed by a Range Rover Autobiography and a Porsche 993, both worth £100,000.

“However, it’s important to note that the average value of vehicles stolen and recovered dropped to an average of £16,436, down from over £19,000 in 2015,” continues Andy Barrs.  “Thieves continued to target more affordable, yet popular brands, such as Ford, Vauxhall, and VW models, which were stolen in even greater numbers in 2016.  27% of all vehicles recovered by TRACKER in 2016 were valued at less than £5,000, including a VW Golf worth £400.

“1 in 3 vehicles recovered by TRACKER were stolen using the owner’s keys.  Although a TRACKER device won’t prevent a vehicle from being stolen, it’s clear from our figures that they significantly increase the chances of it being recovered and returned by the police. We continue to work closely with all UK police forces and in 2016 we assisted with 62 arrests, helping to close the net on the criminals.”

Unlike other stolen vehicle recovery devices, TRACKER’s unique technology can locate vehicles anywhere, even when they are hidden in a garage or shipping container. TRACKER has been reuniting car lovers with their vehicles for over 23 years, and it’s this expertise which makes TRACKER the leader in stolen vehicle recovery.

*The first The TRACKER Top Ten Most Stolen and Recovered League Table was published in 2011

TRACKER’S TOP TEN MOST STOLEN AND RECOVERED
TRACKER 2016 RECOVERY HIGHLIGHTS
Top Models Stolen in 2016 Top Models Stolen in 2015
1. BMW X5 1. Range Rover Sport
2. Range Rover Sport 2. BMW X5
3. BMW M3 3. Range Rover Vogue
4. Mercedes C Class 4. Mercedes C220
5. Mercedes E Class 5. BMW 3 Series
6. BMW 3 Series 6. Mercedes C63
7. Range Rover Autobiography 7. BMW 5 Series
8. Range Rover Vogue 8. Audi RS4
9. Land Rover Defender 9. Range Rover Biography
10. BMW 5 Series 10. Audi Q7
  • TRACKER recovered over £11.5million worth of vehicles in 2016
  • Average value of cars recovered in 2016 was £16,436 a decrease of £2,919, compared to 2015
  • A total of 62 arrests were made in 2016
  • 86 vehicles not fitted with a TRACKER device were also recovered alongside TRACKER recovered vehicles
  • January was the busiest month in 2016 with 74 recoveries in total worth £1,374,500
 Source: Tracker

TRACKER figures show the North/South car theft divide

tracker

The North/South divide is often a cause for debate; however the latest figures from TRACKER show that 64% of cars stolen in the north of England in 2015 were stolen with keys. This compares to just 42% of cars in the south being stolen using keys. It’s clear that all car owners need to be vigilant, when it comes to keeping their car keys safe, but motorists in the north should be particularly vigilant urges TRACKER, the stolen vehicle recovery expert.

When it comes to the favoured models, car thieves in the north of England appear to prefer Mercedes Benz, whilst their counterparts in the south favour BMWs. However, figures indicate that a high percentage of vehicles in the north of the country are stolen by means of car key burglaries, frequently referred to by the police as ‘Hanoi’ or 2-in-1 burglaries, where thieves target a specific address where a desired vehicle is parked or garaged.

Supporting TRACKER’s research, West Yorkshire Police report that thieves committing burglaries in some parts of the county have switched their attention to stealing keys to take vehicles, rather than taking electrical items, money and jewellery. However, the reality is that offences where cars are stolen by means of burglary carry a much higher sentencing tariff than cars stolen by means of conventional vehicle theft.


Mercedes ML63 AMG stolen without keys.
Vehicle found on false plates and 1 arrest was made.

Meanwhile, in the south, car thieves tend to focus on compromising electronic security systems and key cloning, leading to the Metropolitan Police listing vehicle theft as one of its top seven priorities. The microchips embedded in keyless fobs emit a signal to the car which thieves are then able to intercept and copy, allowing them to start the car remotely without the owner’s knowledge. Stealing cars in this way carries a shorter jail sentence, reduces the risk of being caught red-handed and therefore serves as an additional incentive over car key burglaries.

“It’s clear from our survey and police reports that motorists need to take extra steps to protect their vehicles from thieves, but especially people in the north of England,” explains Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER. “Car owners need to be aware that thieves are always finding ways to crack manufacturer’s security measures, whether it’s hacking a vehicle or stealing the keys. This is why fitting a tracking device is fast becoming a vital part of modern security for car owners.

“Stolen vehicle recovery technology offers motorists an added level of protection from criminals. A tracking device won’t stop a car being stolen, but it will increase the chances of police finding and recovering it, even if it’s hidden in a garage or shipping container, making it the best way close the net on thieves.”

Unlike other devices, TRACKER’s unique technology can locate stolen vehicles anywhere, even when they are hidden in a garage or shipping container.  TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery systems work like an electronic homing device. A covert transmitter is hidden in one of several dozen places around the vehicle. There is no visible aerial, so the thief won’t even know it’s there.

Source: Tracker

 

Vehicle theft increases in London for first time in 20 years

tracker-monitor-vhf-stolen-vehicle-recovery-system-69-p

According to the latest Home Office Report*, the Metropolitan Police has seen the first rise in vehicle thefts in 20 years. The report goes on to reveal that organised thieves have adapted to modern security technology, developing more sophisticated techniques to combat keyless entry systems and immobilisers. TRACKER (part of the Tantalum Corporation) highlights the value of stolen vehicle recovery (SVR) technology, as a way to ensure London’s car owners stay one step ahead of thieves.
“With car thefts up in London, car owners can’t simply rely on the security systems that come with their vehicle,” explains Andy Barrs, Head of Police Liaison at TRACKER.  “The Home Office Report reveals that technology to overcome immobilisers is now readily available on the internet and is likely to pass from more seasoned offenders to casual, opportunistic thieves, meaning that thefts in the Capital are likely to increase beyond existing levels.

“Not surprisingly, the Home Office calls for a ‘third wave’ of vehicle security to combat the problem.  And this is why TRACKER believes that SVR and tracking technology could be the next major solution to help police and the motor industry protect motorists from vehicle theft.”

Whilst a TRACKER device won’t stop a car from being stolen, its unique technology will locate the vehicle anywhere, even if it is hidden in a garage or shipping container. TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery systems work like an electronic homing device. A covert transmitter is hidden in one of several dozen places around the vehicle. There is no visible aerial, so the thief won’t even know it’s there.

Andy Barrs concludes, “Whilst independent industry research shows that tracking devices are highly effective in recovering stolen vehicles, sadly, they are only currently installed on a minority of vehicles.   Unfortunately, there is a common misconception that they are the preserve of prestige car owners, but there are a range of competitive tracking products that suit a broad range of vehicles, from mopeds to classic cars and cherished Ford Fiestas and Vauxhall Corsas.   All car owners, particularly those in London, where vehicle crime is now rising, need to invest in tracking technology as a means of thwarting today’s car thieves and protecting their assets.”

*Home Office Report ‘Reducing Criminal Opportunity – vehicle security and vehicle crime’

Source: Tracker

Land Rover Defender thefts up 75%

 landrover def

 

Shocking new statistics from NFU Mutual, reveal that thefts of Land Rover Defenders have increased by a staggering 75%, as gangs of thieves target rural areas to swipe vehicles.  The Defender ceased production in January, which has led to a significant rise in demand for the car and its parts.  Backing NFU Mutual’s campaign to warn Land Rover owners to be vigilant, TRACKER, the UK’s leading stolen vehicle recovery (SVR) provider, adds that many of these stolen vehicles are being shipped overseas, and urges owners to fit a tracking device before they disappear for good, as recommended by NFU Mutual.

Police forces across the UK are reporting a rise in thefts, with many fearing that criminal gangs with links to the US and Eastern Europe are targeting owners.   Land Rover Defender owners are being advised to improve their security by investing several layers of protection, including trackers, alarms and steering-wheel locks.  NFU Mutual is also advising owners to mark components with paint and to keep vehicles locked up or parked in well-lit areas.  Following this advice will substantially increase the chances of these classic 4x4s being located and recovered.

Adrian Davenport, Police Liaison Manager for TRACKER, part of the Tantalum Corporation, says, “Criminal gangs often target particular vehicles when demand increases and the Land Rover Defender is a popular vehicle all around the globe. Not surprisingly, since they’ve been discontinued, the Defender has risen to the top of the car thief’s hit list, with the northeast, southwest and the midlands reported to be where the highest number of insurance claims are being made.

“Owners of Defenders tend to live in rural areas, so well-lit parking isn’t always possible, making it vital that people ensure they take ample security measures.   A tracking device won’t stop a car being stolen, but it can significantly increase the chance of police locating and returning a vehicle to its owners. Without a TRACKER fitted, Land Rover Defenders can be hidden in containers without detection and shipped abroad by organised criminal gangs who will make a tidy profit.  Don’t make it easy for thieves, fit a TRACKER device to help police close the net on the criminals.”

TRACKER’s SVR systems work like an electronic homing device. A covert transmitter is hidden in one of several dozen places around the vehicle, and there is no visible aerial, so the thief won’t even know it’s there.

Unlike any other provider of SVR devices, some TRACKER products combines GSM, GPS and VHF technology, and its use of VHF technology makes it resilient to ‘jamming’, creating the most robust SVR device available.   Jamming devices, readily available on the internet, are increasingly being used by car thieves to disrupt GPS signals so that the police are unable to track and locate stolen vehicles fitted with SVR devises that rely on GPS alone.
Adrian Davenport concludes:  “We strongly advise Land Rover Defender owners to choose a system that provides a more resilient solution and, better still, one that delivers multiple means of location and communication. TRACKER’s SVR systems use unique VHF technology, offering motorists effective safeguards against theft, even if the GPS does fail.”

Source: Tracker/NFU Mutual