Tag Archives: networks

Rohill announces pilot installation of LTEtraNode system

Rohill, specialized in the development, production and sales of professional mobile communication infrastructures today announced two pilot installations of its LTEtraNode system (a LTE/TETRA solution). To demonstrate their innovative communications solutions to international users Rohill has teamed up with two telecommunication operator companies. The pilots will be based upon public LTE to be integrated with TETRA networks and serve the mutual needs of mission critical and broadband of the blue light user groups. One pilot will be hosted in Europe where the other one will be located outside. Further details will be communicated in separate announcements.

As one of the leading providers of critical communication Rohill has successfully integrated TETRA with LTE from Huawei and Alcatel-Lucent and is working on integration with two further LTE platform suppliers. Besides integration with public LTE, Rohill is also working on private LTE solutions subject to availability of frequency spectrum and commits itself to support all leading LTE equipment providers.

“After the Critical Communication World exhibition in Paris this year we have received a very positive feedback and many inquiries for our innovative LTEtraNode solution. Rohill has been leading this industry and two years ago on Budapest Critical Communication World we have introduced LTE integration and have maintained our technology leading position in the mission critical wireless industry since then. Rohill sees heterogeneous network solutions as the future for country wide mission critical communication networks. For this Rohill fully supports open network and modern IP switching technology on carrier grade platforms. The strong advantage for the user is an integrated solution for voice and data according the TETRA feature set with support of broadband data applications. We are excited to make the next step now and work on two pilot installations in 2013 to integrate our solutions with private and public operator-based LTE networks” says Bert Bouwers, CTO of Rohill.

The LTE/TETRA solution enables the mission critical end user to access the same data capacity and capabilities that already have been successfully introduced for public networks. This together with equipment that meets the mission critical requirements in relation to the availability, reliability and encryption makes it an interesting solution for customers. The LTEtraNode solution and future developments will not only aim for the public safety market but for the whole enterprise market like transportation, utilities, oil & gas and industry.

TETRA (Terrestrial Trunked Radio) communication standard is widely used and deployed for mission and business critical voice communications. TETRA provides significant advantages compared to other radio systems, such as the voice quality, the communication features (trunking, priority/preemption, encryption, recording, etc.) and its interoperability capabilities. Private Mobile Radio (PMR) network users increasingly would like to utilize critical communications-specific broadband applications to improve quality of response and to improve efficiency.

LTE (Long Term Evolution), also known as 4G offers much higher uplink and downlink data rates lower latency (allowing a call setup time which is better than what can be achieved by the TETRA standard) and high-speed mobility compared to other access technologies. These features make the technology suitable for building the next-generation mission critical communications networks and applications. The networks are capable of delivering high-bandwidth and demanding applications such as video-based situational awareness, monitoring and interventional applications.

Source: Rohill

 

Three annonces 4G rollout plans for 47 UK Cities

London, Manchester and the Midlands get Three 4G this year

Mobile phone operator Three has become the last to announce the launch of 4G services, saying it will offer them in four major cities by the end of 2013.

Three will start with London, Manchester, Reading and Birmingham.

A further 42 will follow by late 2014 as part of a drive to cover 90% of the UK’s population with 4G services by the end of 2015.

Comparing with other operators, EE already covers over 55% of the population, and O2 and Vodafone turned on their services in August.

Despite starting later than its larger rivals Three will not lose out, says Carrie Pawsey, senior communications analyst at the consultancy Ovum.

“In the early interim period it will make no difference. Apart from EE, the other networks won’t have a significantly larger coverage area.” But, she added, “Three is likely to have larger blackspots for 4G coverage in the long term.”

Three will be using a slice of the high-frequency 1800MHz band allocated for 4G which it won in an auction overseen by telecoms regulator Ofcom.

Three also bought 4G spectrum in Ofcom’s 4G auction in February at the 800MHz band, which has lower bandwidth than 1800MHz but longer reach.

Pawsey said: “It may hurt its market share in the long term, as the other networks expand to cover more of the country and are able to offer higher average speeds”

EE was first to launch a 4G service in the UK on 30 October 2012, well ahead of the Ofcom auction by “re-farming” spectrum it already owned on the 1800MHz band.

After an aggressive rollout, it now covers more than 100 towns around the UK and has over 1 million customers using 4G.

Source: Ben Sullivan CBR Online

TCCA Joins 3GPP For Critical Work

LTE is set to offer increased interoperability between critical communications systems and ubiquitous networks based on 3GPP specifications, without compromising on the highest standards necessary for the secure operation of mission critical voice and data services.

Several new features are being worked on in 3GPP, which has led to a high degree of participation from public safety groups and now sees the TETRA and Critical Communications Association (TCCA) being approved as the latest Market Representation Partner in 3GPP.

At the detailed level, the TCCA’s Critical Communications Broadband Group will work closely with 3GPP, on Spectrum, Architecture, User requirements and on strategic case studies.

The TCCA has set out a plan for its members service evolution, for data and voice for LTE, with four sequential steps identified:

  1. Upgrade existing Mission Critical V+D services until LTE readiness & maturity
  2. Uptake of Non Mission Critical data with commercial LTE
  3. Build Mission Critical Data LTE networks
  4. Migrate Mission Critical Voice

In his proposal to 3GPP, Phil Kidner, the TCCA Chief Executive promised that “The Association will bring a European and global input to 3GPP for critical communications”.

The formal signing of the 3GPP Partnership Agreement will take place at the next meeting of the Partners, in Fukuoka, Japan on the 30th October.

Source: 3GPP

Faster broadband coming to planes, trains and ships as UK eyes spectrum changes

The UK is looking to open up spectrum currently used by satellite Earth stations for vehicle-mounted stations that could boost broadband capacity in aircraft, ships and trains.

The UK’s communications regulator Ofcom is hoping to spur innovation in mobile broadband services by making it easier for satellite operators to use ‘Earth stations on mobile platforms’ (ESOMPs) to deliver passenger broadband.

Ofcom has proposed (PDF) three frequency bands that operators could apply for to support mobile Earth stations mounted on aircraft, ships or other land-based vehicles.

While alternative technologies are already used to provide wi-fi on board in transport, the regulator believes the spectrum could be used to provide links with higher capacity and spur a new market for mobile communications.

Several satellite operators are planning to launch commercial satellite networks in 2013 and 2014 that support the use of mobile earth stations transmitting in the 27.5GHz to 30GHz range, according to Ofcom.

Ofcom also points out that recent advances in stabilised antenna technology make it possible for earth station antennas to track a satellite in orbit even when it’s mounted on a fast moving platform.

While there was a risk the mobile Earth stations could cause interference to other fixed site satellite networks, Ofcom considered that risk “very low”. With the appropriate controls, the mobile stations would cause no more interference than fixed-site earth stations, it said.

It also notes that the aircraft and ship-mounted Earth stations can already operate in international airspace and waters, but that parts of these frequency ranges are used by terrestrial radio systems in some countries. That’s why Ofcom was proposing frequency ranges that are already authorised for satellite Earth station applications, such as the permanent Earth stations and high density fixed-satellite services.

Key proposals Ofcom is seeking feedback on under a public consultation are:

  • Radio equipment for land-based ESOMPs should be exempted from the need to have a Wireless Telegraphy Act 2006 licence
  • Radio equipment for aircraft and ship mounted ESOMPs should be licensed under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 2006 rather than licence-exempt
  • Licensing of aircraft-mounted ESOMPs should be done through variation of the aircraft radio licence issued on Ofcom’s behalf by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) with no additional fee
  • Licensing of ship-mounted ESOMPs should be done through variation of the ship radio licence with no additional fee.

The deadline for stakeholders to respond to the proposal is 10 October 2013 and Ofcom expects to release a statement on the consultation in December.

Source: Liam Tung ZDnet

Topics: Broadband, United Kingdom, Wi-Fi