Tag Archives: IEEE

Aerostats could bring 5G to rural locations at low cost

5G Supertower

5G networks are going to require a lot of new infrastructure and it’s infrastructure that may not always be financially viable in rural locations, but Altaeros – a telecom infrastructure company – may have a solution in the form of airships.

It’s developed aerostats known as SuperTowers, which can lift antennas and receivers 250 metres high, providing coverage to a 10,000 square kilometre (3,860 square mile) area. That, according to IEEE, would usually require 20-30 masts, but it requires just one SuperTower, thereby reducing deployment costs by around 70%.

Right now, these SuperTowers (which you can see in action in the video below) are still in testing, but recently Altaeros successfully tested a 15-metre prototype, and it’s now preparing a commercial version that will be roughly twice the size and deployed in the US later this year.

Initially they will be providing 4G coverage, but the company claims that they’re ready for 5G and eventually it plans to spread them across the world, so there’s a chance that they could be a viable option in the UK by the time 5G networks start being constructed in around 2020.

Autonomous and mobile

Not only are SuperTowers relatively cheap, but unlike most aerostats they’re autonomous, further keeping costs and deployment time down. And because they’re mobile and can be set up in a couple of days they could also be used to provide temporary coverage as needed, at the likes of concerts and sporting events.

Even if Altaeros isn’t ready to bring them to the UK any time soon, another company could use a similar idea, as EE for example has already used similar air mast technology to bring 4G to 2017’s Red Bull Foxhunt.

So one way or another we might soon see airships taking the place of masts in some locations, and it might mean 5G comes to rural places a lot faster than 4G did.

IEEE plans to standardise connected car applications

 

 

ieee-logo

IEEE Forms a Study Group on Wireless Automotive Coexistence

New IEEE 802.19™ study group focuses on automotive environment and use cases for wireless coexistence

 

IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, today announced the IEEE 802.19™ Wireless Coexistence Working Group has established a study group on “Wireless Automotive Coexistence.”

“The IEEE 802.19 working group has been developing standards for coexistence between wireless standards of unlicensed devices,” said Alaa Mourad, chair, Wireless Coexistence study group, University of Kiel. “However, with an uprise in connected cars, we’re seeing the need to develop standards focused on wireless automotive coexistence.”

To address the changes in the automotive industry, this study group will concentrate on automotive environment and use cases, considering:

  • 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequency bands;
  • Interference among IEEE 802.11™ devices;
  • Interference between IEEE 802.11 and IEEE 802.15™ / Bluetooth devices;
  • Coexistence of IEEE 802.11 and IEEE 802.15 / Bluetooth with other non-IEEE 802® wireless technologies.

This group will study the applicability of current standards to address the aforementioned issues and may suggest enhancements that could provide guidance to new standards.

The group intends to develop a project authorization request for a new standard on wireless automotive coexistence.

For more information, visit the IEEE 802.19 Wireless Coexistence Working Group web page.

About the IEEE Standards Association
The IEEE Standards Association, a globally recognized standards-setting body within IEEE, develops consensus standards through an open process that engages industry and brings together a broad stakeholder community. IEEE standards set specifications and best practices based on current scientific and technological knowledge. The IEEE-SA has a portfolio of over 1,100 active standards and more than 500 standards under development. For more information visit the IEEE-SA Web site.

About IEEE
IEEE, a large, global technical professional organization, is dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity. Through its highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities, IEEE is the trusted voice on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics. Learn more at the IEEE Web site.

Source: IEEE

 

60% of cars will be internet-enabled by 2025, says IEEE

The IEEE has released a report saying Internet-enabled vehicles will play an instrumental role in improving the future of commuting. It is estimated that by 2025, 60 percent of the cars on the road will be internet connected, which will promote advanced safety features, upgraded vehicle software protection and the continued adoption of autonomous vehicles.

“With cars being equipped with blue tooth and the ability to interact with mobile devices, we’re already beginning to see car manufacturers implementing connected car technologies,” stated Jeffrey Miller, IEEE member and Associate Professor in the Computer Systems Engineering department at University of Alaska, Anchorage. “The widespread adoption of connected cars will allow consumers to treat their vehicles as just another one of their devices. Hosting mobile operating systems and purchasing data packages from wireless providers will be commonplace in the future.”

21st Century Safety
Internet-connected vehicles will also play a vital role in improving safety and convenience features. As technology supports the communication between people, we will also begin seeing a shift in how vehicles interact with each other, known as vehicle-to-vehicle communication. “Through vehicle-to-vehicle communication, cars will be able to travel in closer proximity at faster speeds, as well as automatically reroute to avoid hazardous weather conditions or congested roadways,” said Christoph Stiller, IEEE member and professor at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. “Because of these features, human error will nearly be removed from driving, therefore making it a safer and more enjoyable experience.”

Hacked on the Highway?
As vehicles become more accepting of wireless communication, connected cars will become increasingly vulnerable to software hacks. “Hackers could potentially have the ability to affect audio features, disable the vehicle’s ignition, override braking systems and infect the software with Trojans and viruses,” said Kevin Curran, IEEE Senior Member and professor of Computing and Engineering at the University of Ulster, U.K. “In order to combat this, manufacturers need to begin setting firewalls in place to restrict access from integrated systems. There is a strong presence of interconnectivity between vehicle networks, so a breach in one network may cause havoc in another.”

Autonomous Vehicles and the Internet: A More Productive Commute
The increased dependence on connected devices and the rise of the internet-enabled vehicle signifies that consumers will increase their trust and reliance on automated systems. This trend will promote increased adoption of autonomous vehicles, further justifying IEEE’s prediction made last year that 75 percent of the cars on the road would be autonomous by 2040.

“Trust in automated technology systems is the key to widespread adoption of autonomous vehicles,” said Alberto Broggi, IEEE Senior Member and professor of computer engineering at the University of Parma in Italy. “It’s amazing to think that just six years ago, smartphones did not exist and now people cannot live without them. This dependence that consumers have acquired will be the catalyst for autonomous vehicles, leading people to trust in automated technology. Within the next five years, lanes will be dedicated for the specific use of autonomous vehicles.”

In the future, Broggi believes that driving will be more of a novelty where, “people will actually pay to drive cars manually similar to go carts.”

Source: IEEE/Telematics News