Tag Archives: google autonomous car

The World Of Self Driven Cars Is Truly Here

Today we have a new technology in the automobile and car industry which might take the world by storm tomorrow. It is known as self driven cars. Yes, the day may not be far off when you could sit and relax with your family in your car as the computer and other advanced technologies takes over the driving and negotiating aspects of the car. We share below the way in which modern day technology has made it real and workable on the ground. The points mentioned below are all now in advanced stages of development and the first fully working prototype of self driven car will soon become a reality thanks to the effort of Google and others.

The World Of Self Driven Cars

 

  1. Laser Ranger Finder

The rotating roof top camera or the laser ranger finder or lidar is the heart of this self driven car. It has 64 laser beams, and can create 3D images which make safe self drive a reality.

  1. Camera For Near Vision

It also comes with a front camera for near vision. It is mounted on the windshield and plays a big role in helping the car to see objects right in front of it while on the move.

  1. Bumper Mounted Radar

The self driven car has 4 radars that are located in the rear and front bumpers. It helps the car to find out more about the cars behind it and in front of it.

  1. Geo-Location Aerial

The car is able to get information about its exact location because of high quality aerial which receives inputs from GPS satellites.

  1. Ultrasonic Sensors

If there are any obstacles on the rear and if there is a need to track movements of the car, the ultrasonic sensors placed on one of the rear wheels will be helpful.

  1. A Few Devices Inside The Car

The insides of the self driven come with some devices such as gyroscopes, altimeters, and tachymeters. This helps to find out the exact. They help to generate the right data for smooth operation of the car.

  1. Sensors Function With Synergy

While there are many sensors, the greatest thing is that all that data collected from the sensors is clearly interpreted by the CPU of the car and this helps in a safe and enjoyable driving experience.

  1. It Can Understand Common Road Signs

Another wonderful feature is that the self driven car from Google will also be able to understand and interpret common motorist signs and road behaviors. It has the ability to understand common signals emanating from other motorists and also cyclists.

  1. It Maps The Route In Advance

Before a self-driven car is chosen for a particular route, a regular car is sent out to map the entire route and come out with a full picture regarding pot holes, road signs, road markers and more. The map is fed into the software of the car to make driving easy.

  1. Can Handle Real Life Behavior

Finally the car has some real life behaviors which have been programmed by Google engineers. It can detect slow moving cars and overtake and also slow down when there are cars coming its way and so on.

Source: Techrogers

Google’s driverless cars learn how to use their horns

google_self-driving_car_horn_honk

 

Google’s self-driving cars are set to adopt the use of the horn, according to the technology giant’s monthly report, pledging that it will be “polite, considerate, and only honk when it makes driving safer for everyone”.

The tech giant revealed that the car horn will be in use only to inform others of the vehicle’s presence in instances when another car is backing out of a driveway or swerving into a lane. The test drivers have been aiding the cars in understanding the appropriate use of the horn. The feature has been tested inside the vehicle so that test drivers can help the software ascertain the appropriate use of the horn.

Google said: “Our goal is to teach our cars to honk like a patient, seasoned driver. As we become more experienced honkers, we hope our cars will also be able to predict how other drivers respond to a beep in different situations.”

Google has trained the self-driving cars to use the horn differently in different situations. For instance, a car moving out of the driveway may be on the receiving end of two short toots while a long blast may be reserved for those who swerve dangerously into another lane. As of today, the company’s cars have traversed more than 1.6 million miles in four different cities over seven years.

Source: Google

 

Google ready to send prototype autonomous cars on to Californian streets this summer

Official Google Blog: Green lights for our self-driving vehicle prototypes

Green lights for our self-driving vehicle prototypes.

When we started designing the world’s first fully self-driving vehicle, our goal was a vehicle that could shoulder the entire burden of driving. Vehicles that can take anyone from A to B at the push of a button could transform mobility for millions of people, whether by reducing the 94 percent of accidents caused by human error (PDF), reclaiming the billions of hours wasted in traffic, or bringing everyday destinations and new opportunities within reach of those who might otherwise be excluded by their inability to drive a car.

Now we’re announcing the next step for our project: this summer, a few of the prototype vehicles we’ve created will leave the test track and hit the familiar roads of Mountain View, Calif., with our safety drivers aboard.

Our safety drivers will test fully self-driving vehicle prototypes like this one on the streets of Mountain View, Calif., this summer.

We’ve been running the vehicles through rigorous testing at our test facilities, and ensuring our software and sensors work as they’re supposed to on this new vehicle. The new prototypes will drive with the same software that our existing fleet of self-driving Lexus RX450h SUVs uses. That fleet has logged nearly a million autonomous miles on the roads since we started the project, and recently has been self-driving about 10,000 miles a week. So the new prototypes already have lots of experience to draw on—in fact, it’s the equivalent of about 75 years of typical American adult driving experience.

Each prototype’s speed is capped at a neighborhood-friendly 25mph, and during this next phase of our project we’ll have safety drivers aboard with a removable steering wheel, accelerator pedal, and brake pedal that allow them to take over driving if needed. We’re looking forward to learning how the community perceives and interacts with the vehicles, and to uncovering challenges that are unique to a fully self-driving vehicle—e.g., where it should stop if it can’t stop at its exact destination due to construction or congestion. In the coming years, we’d like to run small pilot programs with our prototypes to learn what people would like to do with vehicles like this. If you’d like to follow updates about the project and share your thoughts, please join us on our Google+ page. See you on the road!

See the video here>
Source: Chris Urmson, Director, Google Self-Driving Car Project. Official Blog