Tag Archives: CradlePoint

The Benefits of 4G LTE & Software-Defined Networking in Smart Cities

Smart Cities Smart City LTE

Cities & Regions Connect People, Places & Things While Leveraging Data

Cities and public-sector IT personnel must balance a unique combination of community expectations, budget limitations, and employee capacity. As cities become smarter and more connected, community members financially responsible growth. At the same time, it is common for cities to struggle with budgets and for elected officials to be held accountable by the public to ensure they are investing wisely and in ways that have a noticeable impact.

As technology continues to evolve, cities are evolving in parallel. A Smart City, according to Gartner, is “an urbanized area where multiple sectors cooperate to achieve sustainable outcomes through the analysis of contextual real-time information shared among sector-specific information and operational technology systems.”

Broadly speaking, Smart Cities use technology to collect data, analyze information, share results with different departments, and use those results to drive improvement. They understand how the combination of innovation, technology, and collaboration can truly improve the quality of life and the economic well-being of their citizens and businesses.

The effects of 4G LTE and Software-defined Networking (SD-N) have been profound within this context. The potential for connected people, places, and things has enabled cities to provide a deep and vast array of services in many different areas. Today cities are connecting:

  • K-12 public schools, students, and faculty
  • Public recreation centers and other amenities, such as golf courses
  • Fare boxes, passenger WiFi, digital signage, and surveillance cameras on buses in major metro systems
  • Cameras and tracking sensors/RFID tags on school buses
  • Police cars, laptops, body-worn cameras, dash cameras, evidence collection kits, and even IoT sensors to a city’s secure, private network
  • Search and rescue mobile vehicles, particularly those in remote locations
  • Code enforcement and building inspector vehicles, which traditionally serve as remote offices for city employees and contractors
  • Ambulances, stroke kits, and first responders to doctors local at hospitals
  • Traffic cameras, traffic light controllers, and cameras at intersections
  • Public trash compactors and recycling bins, allowing cities to be more efficient in how often receptacles need to be emptied
  • Digital signs that provide live route maps for public transportation users
  • Payment kiosks for citizens wishing to pay for city services out in the field
  • Election machines at precinct locations
  • Sensors for large public events that can be used to look for any kind of public safety threat

These services are increasingly essential to a city’s infrastructure. For example, Gartner predicts that by 2020, “streetlamps will be the primary infrastructure for 80 percent of Smart Cities.” While full of potential, these streetlamps can’t fully function as needed without reliable connectivity solutions. Flexible lighting allows city employees to remotely control switches and dimming devices, thereby enabling efficient, timely management. Video cameras and sensors attached to streetlamps also allow cities the ability to track — in real time — which streets have been plowed during inclement weather.

Without reliable 4G LTE connectivity, along with devices such as routers that can withstand the elements and be updated through the cloud, cities may focus too heavily on becoming a Smart City without paying enough attention to the logistics needed to fully get there.

When cities do fully implement reliable and secure 4G LTE and/or SDN solutions, the effects can be tremendous. The City of San Antonio understood the importance of becoming a Smart City and utilized 4G LTE to assist with traffic management. With more than 1.4 million people and further growth expected, transportation infrastructure is becoming increasingly critical to the city’s quality of life. Its Traffic Management Center needed remote access to monitor key applications, troubleshoot problems, and adjust traffic flow mechanisms (such as timers) in real time. In a city of this size, manual adjustments were no longer a reasonable solution.

By installing Cradlepoint’s cloud-managed routing platforms in nearly 700 traffic cabinets and utilizing 4G LTE, San Antonio now has constant connectivity for reliable access, streamlined network troubleshooting and real-time management, easy physical access, and the potential to scale up the network and applications.

The City of Boise helped its police department further advance the city toward Smart City status by updating its in-vehicle systems. The department upgraded its devices and implemented NetCloud Manager to enable central configuration, monitoring, and management. Whereas it previously took the city as many as 160 staff hours to complete network updates for the whole police cruiser fleet, it now takes approximately 5 minutes with remote cloud management. The cost savings, efficient use of officer resources, reliability, central network management, network flexibility, and future-proofing of these solutions allow the police department to evolve its technological infrastructure while demonstrating to the public its responsible use of valuable resources.

As 5G, often referred to as “next-generation WAN,” becomes more readily available, Smart Cities will have both the opportunity and the obligation to explore how a drastic increase in speeds, combined with a drastic decrease in latency, can better empower their infrastructure, services, and personnel.

The ways in which cities become “smart” depends heavily on the wireless connectivity, devices, and networking infrastructure solutions available to and adopted by IT professionals and approved by city leaders. In essence, the effects of 4G LTE, 5G, IoT, and SDN are only as powerful as the solutions that utilize them.

Learn More About Connecting Smart Cities

Learn more about Smart City drivers, needs, and solutions in our white paper: Developing Smart Cities & Communities.

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint 4G LTE connectivity technology Click here for more info>

Source: Cradlepoint

The Evolution of Cellular Modems for Enterprise Networking

Evolution of Cellular Modems

Embedded Wireless Modems Eliminated the Challenges of External, USB-Based Modems

Wireless modems and connectivity for enterprise networking have come a long way. A variety of factors ranging from technological advancements to innovative customer use cases have transformed cellular modems into a critical component of how a company operates and succeeds — and with 5G on the horizon, that progress is poised to continue.

When modems were first introduced, they were analog, used DSL, and had a simple function: allow computers to connect and pass data to networks. With the advent of cellular technology came the possibility of sending data over wireless connections. This demonstrated the potential of wireless connections for both business and personal use.

The leap to modems that could transfer data wirelessly was significant but difficult. Passing data back and forth through the air was slow, limiting the types and volumes of data that companies could reasonably transfer wirelessly.

The Evolution of USB Modems

In response to the challenges associated with the first wireless modems, manufacturers took another evolutionary step and created USB modems. The first examples were the sleek, stick-like versions that many are familiar with today, but they were not very practical in customer applications.

With the introduction of 3G, individual users could transfer data much easier and faster via a USB modem connected to a laptop. Before Starbucks offered free WiFi to its customers, for example, a professional working remotely from a coffee shop could potentially use a USB modem and his or her laptop to connect to the Internet using cellular technology. Thanks to 3G, this connection was finally reliable and fast enough to truly make remote work — and access — possible.

As 3G developed into a viable data transfer mechanism, Cradlepoint realized the potential it presented and began adding support for USB modems in its routers. If an enterprise bought a router, it could get a USB modem from a provider (such as AT&T or Sprint) and plug it in; the device would then be able to connect. This setup essentially created the first forms of WiFi hot spots, as the Cradlepoint router was able to share a connection to the Internet.

Eliminating the Challenges of USB Modems

Customer creativity complemented, and even advanced, the technological evolution of modems. As wireless routers were able to transfer data more reliably and quickly, customers began using them in new, innovative ways. While in-vehicle deployment wasn’t necessarily part of the initial goal for developing wireless routers, emergency responders saw the potential of deploying wireless access in their vehicles.

However, USB modems presented unique challenges — most notably, form factor and durability. For instance, when police cars or ambulances took sharp turns quickly during emergencies, modems often were damaged or simply broke off. They weren’t designed to work in such conditions.

Further, USB modems stick out from whatever device they’re plugged into to, making them easy to steal by passersby.

When 3G eventually evolved into 4G, the USB stick modems were still in use by customers, but they started to prefer a smaller-footprint, embedded solution. Thus, Cradlepoint began buying the actual modem modules from vendors directly and embedding them into higher-quality, more compact enterprise routers — eliminating the challenges related to USB sticks.

The Benefits of Embedded Modems

The evolution from 3G to 4G ushered in significant improvements for connectivity. With 3G, some companies (such as Verizon and Sprint) were based on CDMA technology, while others (such as AT&T and T-Mobile) were based on GSM technology. The two technologies had disparate 3G speeds, and CDMA-based companies needed a way to increase their speeds. 4G and LTE met the challenge.

4G has ushered in a new chapter of modem evolution. Modern routers provide many more enhancements and solutions than the simple connected/disconnected features offered by the earliest USB devices.

Customer use cases have helped drive enhancements and solutions, too. Modems that used to be damaged in high-speed situations in ambulances and police cars, for instance, are now field-tested and shock-certified specifically for in-vehicle use.

Additional advancements include Auto Carrier Selection. With carrier-switchable embedded modems, Cradlepoint can self-detect the SIM and configure the modem to the given carrier automatically. This significantly boosts flexibility and reduces IT man-hours.

Of course, modems will never stop evolving. The combination of consumer creativity and technological innovation will always create new and exciting steps forward. Over its history, Cradlepoint has supported as many as 300 types of modems and continues to learn from its experiences supporting the evolution from USB devices to embedded modems. Overall, Cradlepoint continues to build on current LTE technologies and looks forward to the transition to 5G.

Source: Janice Mainvil-Cradlepoint

Cradlepoint Connect Provides New Levels of Cloud Management

How Remote Connect Provides New Levels of Cloud Management

Remote Connect LAN Manager

IT Administrators Can Manage Nearly Any LAN Device Through NetCloud Manager

The scope of things that organizations must connect to their enterprises network continues to expand, with seemingly no end in sight. In response, there are exciting new options for network administrators and IT teams to simply and securely access, manage, and troubleshoot virtually any device — from routers to just about anything that lives on the LAN.

Cradlepoint’s NetCloud Manager Remote Connect allows IT administrators to instantly and securely access devices remotely through the cloud. Remote Connect gives IT administrators a suite of functionality including secure, real-time remote cloud management of both Cradlepoint devices and third-party, LAN-connected devices — allowing them to be cloud managed from a single pane of glass with no additional setup.

Remotely Connect to LAN Devices

Remote Connect LAN Manager allows administrators to connect to nearly any device that can get an IP address on the LAN through Cradlepoint NetCloud Manager (NCM). Essentially, this makes third-party devices that previously were inaccessible now capable of being managed securely through the cloud — without any additional software or hardware.

Until now, management of devices on the LAN — everything from switches and access points to security cameras and digital signs — has been complex, to say the least. IT specialists had to set up a variety of complex routing rules, port forwarding, and more, plus they potentially had to purchase third-party software for each and every device.

Today, the entire process is simpler — in the cloud — through Remote Connect. Once plugged in, a device that lives behind a router on the LAN is accessible from anywhere in the world through NCM’s single pane of glass. That device, with its IP address and host name, immediately appears in the NCM platform; the IT team can make it cloud managed with one click.

The cost savings potential of Remote Connect are vast, as IT managers can avoid purchasing individual cloud management services for the rapidly growing list of devices on their network. They can also avoid on-site IT or truck rolls for troubleshooting, setup, and diagnostics of devices that were previously inaccessible, accept from the LAN.

Advanced Out-of-Band Management (OOBM)

With a traditional network architecture, when wired-line connectivity is down, an IT team cannot manage the primary router. However, if the organization is using a Cradlepoint router for failover LTE connectivity, an IT professional can use advanced OOBM to traverse through a Cradlepoint router and troubleshoot or config any generic primary router remotely (or any device with a serial console port).

Advanced OOBM affords IT staff the same capabilities as if they were sitting next to and plugged into the primary router — regardless of whether the wired line is up or down. Then the IT staff can troubleshoot and determine — if not implement — potential fixes.

The business benefits and ROI of advanced OOBM are substantial, including the ability to troubleshoot and repair the primary router without sending someone to the location. OOBM also eliminates the need to rely on a non-IT, on-site employee to help with troubleshooting and eliminates the monthly POTS (analog) circuit subscription for OOBM.

Robust Real-Time Info & Troubleshooting

Each Cradlepoint router runs the NetCloud Operating System (NetCloud OS), which network administrators now can access remotely via Remote Connect for robust real-time statuses, troubleshooting information, and logs.

Router-level data available through NCM’s Remote Connect GUI is more fine grain, including information such as Connection Manager interface status, VPN tunnel status, router tables, system logs, connected client list, firewall tracking and hit counter, and many more. Also, access is highly secure, with no static IP or open SSH / SSL ports required.

It’s just like local access to each router’s UI — but anytime, from anywhere, through the cloud. Organizations can leverage this service for highly valuable real-time trouble-shooting, with always-available insights into routing tables, which clients are connected, and how much data clients are using.

Router Console Access

Remote Connect allows IT teams to connect remotely to the console of a Cradlepoint router, and recently this feature has undergone some improvements. Now the data available to IT departments through CLI access is more in-depth than ever. Access to more robust real-time analytics is particularly helpful for troubleshooting. Suspected router issues such as slow service or misdirected traffic can be viewed via real-time routing tables. This real-time data stream means IT professionals can provide real-time fixes as well.

Additional Software-Defined Solutions

Many organizations today are looking to not only perform device administration and management remotely, but to actually create an easy, flexible, instant, secure network over commodity Internet from anywhere at any time. NetCloud Engine, Cradlepoint’s Software-Defined Perimeter (SD-P) solution, allows IT teams to instantly create always-on Virtual Cloud Networks over any Internet connection that allows IoT devices, administrators, and resources to have constant communication with each other.

Source: Cradlepoint

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint Software and 4G LTE & WiFi Routers. For more information please click here

Cradlepoint secures $89M in funding for software and new product initiatives

CRADLEPOINT logo

Cradlepoint Secures $89 Million in Series C Funding Led by TCV to Deliver Next Generation Network Solutions for Enterprises Embracing Digital Transformation

Growth-stage Investment to Fuel Cradlepoint’s Continued Growth and Expand Product Initiatives in SDN, 5G Wireless Broadband, and Enterprise IoT

BOISE, Idaho – March 9, 2017 – Cradlepoint, the global leader in cloud-based network solutions for connecting people, places, and things over wired and wireless broadband, today announced it has closed $89 million in Series C funding. The round was led by TCV, a leading provider of capital to growth-stage private and public companies in the technology industry. Cradlepoint will use these funds to drive continued growth and further capitalize on the disruption in the enterprise wide area networking market as the result of Digital Transformation (the digitization of every business process and interaction). This includes expanding product initiatives in Software-Defined Networking (SDN), advanced 4G and 5G wireless connectivity, and enterprise Internet of Things (IoT).

In connection with the financing, Ted Coons, General Partner at TCV, and Doug Gilstrap, Venture Partner at TCV, have joined Cradlepoint’s board of directors.

The Cradlepoint investment continues TCV’s legacy of investing in sector-leading companies, such as Netflix, GoDaddy, ExactTarget, Redback Networks, and Splunk. With over 15,000 customers and 1.5 million units deployed to date worldwide, and having achieved an over 40 percent compound aggregate growth rate (CAGR) for the last three years, Cradlepoint is the leading provider of 4G LTE network solutions for enterprises, governments, and mobile operators. The company’s diverse customer base includes 50 percent of Fortune 100, 75 percent of the world’s top retailers, and 25 of the largest US cities.

“Cradlepoint has established a strong foundation as the leader in cloud-managed 4G LTE network solutions,” said George Mulhern, CEO of Cradlepoint. “The investment by TCV, and their experience in guiding disruptive companies, will allow us to build on this foundation to capitalize on the opportunity in front of us as digital transformation drives WAN transformation. SDN, 4G/5G wireless broadband, mobile networking and IoT technologies will all play a pivotal role in the new connected enterprise, and we are well-positioned to lead the way.”

Digital transformation is accelerating cloud, mobile and IoT adoption — giving rise to the Connected Enterprise, putting greater emphasis on the wide area network (WAN). According to a report by IDC, the burgeoning market for SDN in the WAN (SD-WAN) is projected to reach $12.5 billion by 2020, spurred on by the need for more agile, automated and available networks and a direct result of digital transformation.

“With roots in enterprise-grade 4G LTE, hardware solutions that span branch, vehicle and IoT use cases, integrated with powerful software that enables remote management and network control, Cradlepoint has the technology and momentum to be a major player in the next generation of enterprise WANs,” stated Ted Coons, General Partner at TCV. “A clear technological advantage combined with market leadership and the ability to innovate are key attributes of companies that we choose to partner with, and we are delighted to support the Cradlepoint team as they continue on their growth path.”

“By 2020, the number of people, vehicles, and things connected to the enterprise network will start to dwarf fixed branch sites,” stated Eric Hanselman, chief analyst at 451 Research. “This dramatic shift in the volume and variety of connections will force the enterprise WAN to become more cloud-orchestrated, software-defined, and wirelessly connected and has already started to usher in an entirely new network security model. With this investment by TCV, Cradlepoint now has the potential to become a major player in wide-area networking for the connected enterprise.”

Source: Cradlepoint

Cradlepoint Helps San Antonio Give its Traffic Management System and Smart City Initiative the Green Light

san-antonio

Cradlepoint, the global leader in cloud-based network solutions for connecting people, places, and things over wired and wireless broadband, has announced that it’s helping the City of San Antonio scale its traffic management system to meet high population growth expectations.

Cradlepoint has enabled the City of San Antonio to become a Smart City by streamlining its traffic management system to realize a nearly 100 percent rate of communication across its network, all while reducing the amount of resources needed to maintain the network.

The city is currently home to 1.4 million people, so traffic congestion had become a big headache for both the residents and traffic officials when its legacy management system experienced inconsistent remote communications support. In response, the City of San Antonio began utilizing Cradlepoint solutions for always-on, cloud-managed primary LTE connectivity across its distributed traffic network.

San Antonio’s Traffic Management Center is responsible for the city’s nearly 1,400 intersections. The city’s complex legacy network included a mesh of a dozen radio towers and 300 wired and wireless access points that served as reference nodes to the rest of the network. However, its legacy infrastructure performed inconsistently, only allowing staff to engage with about 60 percent of the city’s intersections. This created a serious issue, as staff need constant access to the traffic network to centrally monitor key applications, troubleshoot problems, and adjust the clocks that synchronize traffic lights and flow.

Cradlepoint helps the City of San Antonio overcome these issues with cloud-managed COR IBR1100 LTE routers as the primary WAN source throughout the traffic management network. Most importantly, the Traffic Management Center now has the scalability required to meet the city’s expected growth without sacrificing speed or connectivity.

“As the commutes for our motorists began to slow, we knew we had to implement a new solution that would address our network communication issues. However, this could be a huge, intimidating undertaking for staff of just 16 individuals. Cradlepoint took the uncertainty out of the equation,” said Marc Jacobson, manager, City of San Antonio’s Traffic Management Center. “Cradlepoint has changed our mindset to the point that we are beginning to come up with new ways to utilize cloud-managed LTE to make our jobs easier, and to make the ride better for everyday commuters.”

“As cities grow, their infrastructure will need to adapt to the growing needs of the general public. Cradlepoint is dedicated to providing solutions that integrate the best of cloud, SDN, and 4G LTE to not only address the network issues of today, but also to easily scale networks to efficiently meet future demands,” said Ian Pennell, chief marketing officer, Cradlepoint. “For the City of San Antonio, this means the Traffic Management Center can initiate Smart City initiatives, begin to ease traffic congestion, and create a better commuting environment for residents, tourists, and future San Antonians.”

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint Wireless Gateways. Please click here for more information>

7 Things to Know About LTE Advanced

LTE Advanced and Carrier Aggregation

Carrier Aggregation Enables LTE-A to be Three Times Faster Than Previous Generation of LTE

Because LTE Advanced (LTE-A) routing is on the cutting edge of networking technology, there aren’t many resources available online that identify business cases for adopting the service. Most resources that are available online are filled with jargon or are outdated, i.e. published when the spec was released years before the service was available.

Whether you’re an expert who needs help articulating the case for investing in LTE-A-compatible technologies or you’re largely unfamiliar with the service, consider this your go-to primer.

Benefits of LTE Advanced are rooted in carrier aggregation

First things first: carrier aggregation is the innovative new feature on which LTE-A is built. In conventional LTE networks, carriers broadcast in multiple frequency bands, but each device or 4G router can only utilize a single frequency band at a time. At any given time, certain frequency bands may be overtaxed with traffic, while other frequency bands remain underutilized. This means the devices are underutilizing the network resources, and quality-of-service (QoS) might be negatively impacted by high-volume usage on one band within a geographic area or when applications require a lot of bandwidth.

Carrier aggregation, however, makes it possible for carriers to transmit data to a device like a wireless router over multiple network bands at once, through a single “aggregated data pipe.”

LTE Advanced offers better Quality-of-Service (QoS)

LTE-A utilizes a more efficient packet scheduling protocol and allows carriers to manage radio frequency resources more flexibly. In other words, the packets of data carried over the network can get where they’re going using more efficient routes, and there’s a lower likelihood that those data will be lost in transmission. Network providers can better allocate radio spectrum resources across their network, intelligently selecting which users connect via which frequency bands to enhance quality and capacity in spite of finite spectrum.

That means businesses that rely on wireless networks will be able to use and create higher-bandwidth applications, enjoy better access to cloud storage and software, and work faster.

LTE Advanced is more reliable

With single-band LTE, it is possible for connectivity to be interrupted for a few seconds when a device switches frequency bands. In contrast, because LTE-A utilizes multiple frequency bands at once, devices switch frequency bands in just a few milliseconds. Additionally, even if one band drops, the device stays connected via the second band in the aggregated data pipe.

Businesses will be able to trust LTE-A to provide connectivity for even their most mission-critical applications.

Carriers are using LTE-A & ‘small cells’ to address data demand

While traditional LTE is already widely recognized by mobile and distributed enterprises as a critical business enabler, one potential drawback is the potential for radio spectrum interference in densely crowded areas like urban centers and stadiums. Additionally, the demand for data is growing exponentially. Today, cellular carriers are aggressively deploying small-cell radio access nodes in many urban centers in concert with their efforts to expand their LTE-A coverage. These small-cell nodes have a short range, but they help increase network capacity and decrease congestion.

This move by carriers will make it possible for enterprises to continue the shift to wireless networking, because carriers will be better able to meet the rapidly increasing demand for wireless bandwidth.

LTE-A is three times faster than the previous generation of LTE

Current-generation LTE networks aren’t reaching their full potential speeds, so you may be wondering whether LTE-A will be able to significantly improve network performance. The answer is yes, thanks to carrier aggregation.

Recently we conducted a speed test here in Boise on AT&T’s network. On single-band LTE, we saw speeds of about 4 Mbps. When we measured speed for the LTE-A service, we reached speeds more than three times faster — 15 Mbps. Across the U.S., the trend is similar: with conventional LTE, typical speeds range from 5-12 Mbps, while LTE-A offers advertised speeds of 10-25 Mbps. We have been getting reports of speed tests using our routers coming in at 60 Mbps, 80 Mbps and even up to 156 Mbps on commercial networks in the U.S.

LTE Advanced illustration

LTE Advanced is available across the U.S.

All major carriers in the U.S. are quickly rolling out LTE-A on their networks. AT&T and Verizon started in major metro areas (NFL cities, to be exact) and continue to expand. T-Mobile and Sprint have a great percentage of their LTE networks covered by LTE-A at this point.

Some carriers have their own branded name for LTE-A services, while others may brand it later. T-Mobile is calling it “Wideband LTE,” Sprint labels it “LTE Plus” (they retired the Sprint Spark name), and Verizon has been rolling it out under its “XLTE” brand, but we’re adding “with carrier aggregation” to delineate. AT&T hasn’t announced a branded name for LTE Advanced yet.

Cradlepoint launched the world’s first & only suite of LTE Advanced-compatible routers

Cradlepoint is the industry leader in 4G LTE. We were the first to support LTE connectivity using a USB stick, the first to engineer an LTE router with an embedded modem, and now our LTE-A routers are the only line of routing products on the market that enterprises can use to take advantage of LTE-A.

Here are a few features of our new platforms:

  • Supports carrier aggregation for two frequency bands
  • SIM-based automatic carrier selection for all of North America (just insert an active SIM and power up)
  • Backwards-compatible with traditional LTE and HSPA+
  • No price increase over our Category 3 LTE routers

LTE-A has very real bottom-line benefits for mobile and distributed enterprises with high-bandwidth needs. For example, a bus carrying 60 passengers can use LTE-A to offer more bandwidth and network capacity, creating a better experience for riders. A retail store with dozens of different applications and multiple Parallel Networks that all depend on wireless connectivity for either primary or failover connectivity can enjoy even greater reliability, better QoS, and significantly faster speeds to enhance customer experience.

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint Wireless Gateways. Click here for more info>

Source: Cradlepoint

Cradlepoint at the forefront of LTE-A Routing Platform Technology

Cradlepoint is First in the World with LTE Advanced Routing Platform for the Enterprise

CRADLEPOINT logo

Enhanced Solutions Portfolio Enables Faster Connections & More Reliable Coverage for Mobile, Data-Rich Applications

Cradlepoint, the global leader in software-defined 4G LTE network solutions for enterprises, announced today the world’s first suite of LTE Advanced (LTE-A) routing platforms for branch and in-vehicle networks. As carriers are introducing Category 6 LTE-A technology into their networks to increase bandwidth speeds and coverage, Cradlepoint is the first to empower businesses to leverage these capabilities with an enterprise-grade WAN solution. Cradlepoint has already set the standard for connecting enterprise networks with LTE to more easily and reliably complement, augment, and extend their existing primary networks. By integrating LTE-A capabilities into its solution portfolio, it is supporting even faster connections and better coverage so its customers can do more and wire less.

“LTE Advanced is an important step forward for enterprises that require flexible untethered last-mile access. The addition of carrier aggregation boosts the amount of bandwidth available to critical applications deployed in locations that require wireless access. Other advances, such as support for multiple-input, multiple-out (MIMO) antennas and higher order modulation, help ensure solid performance even at the edge of a mobile operator’s cell,” said Ken Rehbehn, principal analyst, mobile infrastructure at 451 Research. “For enterprises requiring agile and effective connections to supplement wired network access or tackle coverage in areas lacking wired access, LTE Advanced provides an industrial-grade wireless access alternative that delivers benefits of high-speed, ubiquity, and scale. With the growth of remote cloud access, IoT, and increasingly mobile employees, LTE Advanced becomes fundamental for the new connected organization.”

“Mobility demands continue to rise across the enterprise, from connecting body and dash cameras in police cruisers, to securing tablet-based POS networks in neighborhood retail shops. LTE is the connectivity choice for many enterprises to support these data-rich applications because it is reliable, flexible, and easy to manage,” said Ian Pennell, CMO at Cradlepoint. “Cradlepoint helps enterprises cut wires and unleash new opportunities because we are connecting people, places, and things that traditional wired networks cannot. LTE Advanced is the next stage in our ability to support sophisticated networks at the edge, and make constant connectivity easy.”

Cradlepoint’s LTE-A modems will be embedded in Cradlepoint’s AER series of edge routing solutions, ARC series of failover and Out of Band Management solutions, and in the COR IBR1100 ruggedized mobile network solution. The new platforms, in concert with new firmware and Enterprise Cloud Manager (ECM) features, enhance Cradlepoint’s solutions for enterprise edge networks like retail, food & beverage, and branch office verticals, and transportation or in-vehicle networks like police and emergency responders, mass transit, mobile healthcare, and commercial fleets.

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint Wireless Gateways. Please contact us for more info:

t: +44 (0) 1423 340066 e: sales@co-star.co.uk

Source: Cradlepoint

Cradlepoint Provides Connectivity for Multiple Entertainment Applications In Luxury Vehicle Fleet

Cradlepoinaer2100t Helps JetLoungeX Keep the Party Connected

Luxury transportation service creates the ultimate entertainment experience and new revenue opportunities with LTE connectivity

Cradlepoint, the global leader in software-defined 4G LTE network solutions for enterprises, announced today that it’s helping JetLoungeX (JLX) connect an advanced in-vehicle entertainment system designed for luxury limousine, mobile gaming, corporate travel, and party bus services. When developing its lavish entertainment vehicle experience, JLX looked to support a wide variety of applications—from interactive social media access and selfie photo booths, to printing, teleconferencing, and digital signage. To meet the high-bandwidth demands these latency-sensitive applications require, JLX needed always-on, flexible in-vehicle network connectivity. Cradlepoint empowers JLX to create a reliable and secure LTE-based network to connect all applications, expand opportunities to promote revenue-generating ad content, and extend connectivity to passengers for the ultimate transportation experience.

Reliable connectivity isn’t just for fixed locations anymore. Traveling employees need to connect to the office while at remote sites just as much as passengers now expect complimentary Wi-Fi while traveling. Cradlepoint enables businesses, retailers, educators, healthcare providers, public safety, and public transportation to connect anyone anywhere. Cradlepoint’s LTE solutions are highly reliable, ruggedized, and easy to deploy and manage—making them ideal for challenging in-vehicle network environments. Specific to JLX, Cradlepoint’s AER2100 platform was selected to support the robust bandwidth needs of 12 in-vehicle computers, for both primary and failover connectivity. These computers run applications like the first of its kind selfie Fotopod Photo Booth that uploads in real-time to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, all while keeping music humming and digital advertisements running. The solution is built on open architecture that enables any enterprise to easily increase bandwidth, reliability, security, and flexibility with a compact, all-in-one solution.

“We’ve always had a good understanding of our in-vehicle network bandwidth capacity and performance requirements being driven by our entertainment system. However, it was challenging to support those connectivity needs until we found Cradlepoint. The company provided us with an all-inclusive, feature-rich solution,” said Devin Foxx, CEO at JetLoungeX. “Cradlepoint helped us upgrade our network capabilities and successfully transform the use of our vehicles from a traditional limousine service into an all-around transport entertainment experience. It’s a completely different ball game and wouldn’t be possible without Cradlepoint.”

“Cradlepoint enables enterprises to do more and wire less. For JLX, this capability is critical to continuously connecting an abundance of technology in its fleet of luxury entertainment vehicles. For others, it could mean connecting patrol cars so a police officer can spend more time in the field, a nurse can travel to care for her immobile patients while accessing medical records remotely, and a retailer can create a pop-up shop at a city festival and securely manage enough transactions to exceed its annual sales goal. We are helping businesses harness the power of LTE to create reliable, flexible, and secure networks that augment, complement, and extend the capabilities of traditional connectivity,” said Ian Pennell, chief marketing officer for Cradlepoint.

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint Wireless Gateways for WiFi and 4G LTE Connectivity in vehicles. Please click here for more information>

Source: Cradlepoint/Co-Star

 

Wireless Networking Expands Possibilities for Smart Cities & Smart Communities

Smart Cities Buildings Management

Sensors & the IoT Spark Cost-Efficiency Opportunities for Public Sector Organizations

Local government is a 24/7 enterprise. Constantly changing dynamics and daily emergencies have always put pressure on city governments to be both nimble and cost-efficient. In the digital age, citizens expect cities to respond to their needs and mandates even quicker than before, and they want to be able to access city services conveniently — whenever and wherever. Of course, citizens also still expect cities to make the most of their tax dollars.

Cradlepoint Smart Cities expert, Ken Hosac, VP of Business Development, to:

  • Highlight some of the most impactful Smart City applications,
  • Discuss where the Smart City movement is headed,
  • And offer insight into how wireless and software-defined networking (SDN) help cities address their communities’ changing needs.

What exactly is a Smart City?

“It’s the idea that technology and innovation and collaboration can improve the quality of life of citizens and the well-being of its businesses; cities that are smart take advantage of that,” says Hosac. Smart Cities are utilizing the cloud and the Internet of Things. In fact, Gartner reports that more than a billion Internet of Things devices are installed in Smart Cities worldwide, and that number is projected to more than double by 2017.

“Most cities are becoming incrementally smarter all the time. You might not notice it on a day-to-day basis, but over time you see a big difference,” notes Hosac.

Popular Smart City Technologies

Public Transit: Currently, the most widely enjoyed Smart City technologies often revolve around in-vehicle connectivity. For example, many cities are using 4G LTE connectivity to provide WiFi on public transit, in order to attract greater ridership, says Hosac.

Public Safety: Many law enforcement agencies also have come to rely on wireless in-vehicle connectivity. Increased police scrutiny and a growing demand for transparency is motivating law enforcement agencies to implement body-worn and dash cameras to give the public greater oversight of their activities. “We’re seeing that not just here in the United States, but in Europe and Africa as well,” notes Hosac.

With wireless in-vehicle Internet, officers can upload footage to the cloud, stream in real time, and file reports — all without having to make an extra trip to headquarters. Less time performing administrative tasks back at the station means more time for community policing.

Emerging Applications

Pop-Up Networks: A few cities are utilizing wireless Internet to provide temporary connectivity during elections. The Board of Elections can quickly set up a wireless “pop-up” network just for Election Day, and voters use computers (which can also produce a paper ballot to guard against potential tampering) to cast their votes.

Voters enjoy the convenience and faster reporting of results, while the city benefits from a more efficient elections process.

Data Analytics: Emerging Smart City applications will allow cities to better gather and leverage real-time data. “It’s not mainstream yet,” says Hosac, but in the near future, many cities will, for example, “have sensors in trash Dumpsters that can tell how full the Dumpster is, and combine that information with temperature measurements to help cities determine which Dumpsters to empty each day.” Applications like this will allow cities to save money by limiting energy/fuel expenditures and personnel hours needed to deliver vital city services.

Smart Parking: Smart parking is another application with a promising future. Cities seeking to limit the traffic and pollution impact of drivers endlessly searching for parking use Internet-connected sensors and meters to update parking maps in real time. Drivers access data through a cloud application that allows them to quickly locate open parking spaces.

In either of the previous two scenarios, Internet of Things devices are organized on a wireless mesh network, with an Internet-connected gateway device stationed on approximately every block.

The Growing Role of Wireless & Software-Defined Networks (SDN)

Today, leading cities are using wireless and SDN to provide connectivity for their Smart City applications.

“Wireless connectivity opens up a whole new range of applications that couldn’t be addressed with wired networks,” says Hosac. “Mobile applications are especially dependent on it, but it’s also making a big impact on temporary locations and pop-up networking. The instant scalability and ease-of-management make it possible for cities to tailor the network to their exact and ever-evolving needs. These technologies provide the flexibility needed to make adjustments quickly as the city’s needs change.”

The ever-increasing prevalence of the Internet of Things in community operations is taking many Smart City ideas from dream to reality. According to projects, $39.5 billion will be spent on Smart City technologies in 2016 (SOURCE: Onvia).

Co-Star supply the full range of Cradlepoint Wireless Gateways please click here for more info>

Source: Cradlepoint

 

5 Ways 4G is Improving Healthcare

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Patients and Medical Professionals Benefit From Wireless Connectivity

Advancements in technology and connectivity are simultaneously improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare. One of the most powerful factors in the rapid evolution of healthcare IT has been the development of 4G LTE networking.

Reliable wireless connectivity enables thousands of new technologies and applications to help medical care providers “Cut-the-Wire” and provide care far beyond hospital walls. From kiosks and the Internet of Healthcare Things (IoHT) to Telehealth, mobile clinics, and electronic medical records—connectivity is revolutionizing the ways people tend to their health and well-being.

Kiosks

Waiting Room Kiosks: Reliable wireless connectivity gives providers the flexibility to place patient kiosks in waiting rooms to streamline simple data entry, as well as create a more personalized patient experience. At kiosks, patients can:

  • Set appointments and check in
  • Complete forms and questionnaires
  • Scan driver licenses and insurance cards
  • View account balances and pay for services
  • Review medical information
  • Learn more about specific medical conditions and how to care for them
  • Use interactive maps to navigate the building or campus

Specialized Kiosks: Some kiosks are used to increase awareness of and seek candidates for medical donations. Often set up in retail outlets, office complexes, and other high-traffic areas, these kiosks allow potential organ, blood, and bone marrow donors to answer screening questions and watch videos about the process.

Potential donors also can see profiles and photos of patients in need of donations, and they can sign up to receive a donor-testing kit in the mail.

Diagnostic Kiosks: Diagnostic kiosks have been around for decades. For example, blood pressure stations in pharmacies and grocery stores are used by an estimated 70 million people each year.

Today, the potential for diagnostic kiosks to improve patient care and operational efficiencies is rapidly growing. 4G LTE is helping usher in an era of kiosks with Machine-to-Machine (M2M) functionality to help providers do more than just remotely collect data from patients.

Today’s “clinic-in-a-store” kiosks can connect patients to physicians in real time. A patient may use a kiosk to conduct and transmit a retinal scan to an ophthalmologist, who can diagnose ocular disorders based on the findings.

Some kiosks serve as virtual offices where onsite healthcare professionals can conduct diagnostic appointments between remote physicians and patient. These kiosks also are capable of:

  • Updating patient health records on the spot
  • Gauging vital signs and informing patients whether they should seek further medical advice.
  • Administering diagnostic tests and then saving the results for patients to review and track online from their homes

The Internet of Healthcare Things (IoHT)

In the just the past few years, wireless technologies and medical devices within the Internet of Healthcare Things (IoHT) have transformed the way medical care is delivered. For instance, a new generation of intelligent heart rate monitors, blood pressure cuffs, glucometers, asthma inhalers, and thermometers no longer must be connected with wires.

These days, patients can send providers integral personal health information from the waiting room, at home, or even as they travel. For those with more severe medical conditions, healthcare professionals can remotely monitor patients’ vital signs via 4G LTE-connected, wearable body sensors.

Real-time data improves the ability of providers to quickly and accurately administer treatment based on up-to-date information. In other words, it helps achieve better health outcomes.

One of the most significant challenges physicians face is ensuring patients take medicine when and how it was prescribed. New wireless IoHT technology embedded in pill bottles enables doctors to remotely track whether a patient has taken his or her medicine.

Telehealth

The rise in healthcare costs has led to a reduction in the number of physicians and medical staff available to treat patients. Emerging trends in Telehealth seek to correct this imbalance through the use of wireless networks to connect providers with one another from remote locations.

Modern-day healthcare professionals can use video conferencing to bridge the gap between rural and urban offices. A family medicine physician in a small town can consult with specialists in a large city much easier than before. This practice literally can save the life of a rurally located patient who needs highly specialized care.

With systems now in place to remotely share electronic medical records, review scans or X-rays, and discuss treatment options in real time, doctors can save substantial time and money—which is important for everyone.

Mobile Healthcare

One of the most transformative improvements in healthcare technology has been in-vehicle connectivity. Emergency medical personnel now send triage information and patient histories ahead to the emergency room from the road.

While the patient is en route, ER staff can monitor vital signs, review photos or videos that might help diagnose the patient, check the person’s prescription drug history, and dictate treatment instructions to paramedics.

In-vehicle 4G LTE connectivity allows patients at mobile clinics to receive highly advanced healthcare services without setting foot in a traditional doctor’s office. Also, with mobile routers small enough to fit in a carry-on, in-home and mobile caretakers enjoy a secure, reliable Internet connection for accessing reference materials, email, and patient medical and prescription histories.

Electronic Health Records (EHRs)

The healthcare industry’s widespread move toward electronic health records has streamlined various processes and made access to a patient’s medical history practically instant— from anywhere.

Remote access to EHRs has been particularly useful in emergency care. As soon as first responders know a patient’s name, they can gain access to a wealth of information about medical status and begin to treat the patient accordingly.

Patients directly benefit from EHRs. They are are subjected to far fewer redundant questions from multiple practitioners during sign-in and follow-up processes. In turn, practitioners can spend a larger percentage of their time providing care.

Of course, security is a major factor regarding EHRs, as well as one of the main concerns for network administrators at healthcare facilities. Should a data breach result in patients’ personal, medical, or financial data being stolen, the resulting fallout could harm patients and subject the provider to fines for failure to comply with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) or Payment Card Industry (PCI) guidelines.

Cradlepoint’s 4G LTE routing and cloud management solutions enable best-in-breed, cloud-based network security applications — that fully meet HIPAA and PCI regulations — to keep patients, hospital administrators and IT managers at ease.

“Our infrastructure is more secured now because of how Cradlepoint has enabled us to configure, monitor, and manage the network,” said Shawn Wiora, CIO and CISO forCreative Solutions in Healthcare. “We’ve made tremendous progress in achieving a much higher level of awareness of the network. If someone were to try to attack our facilities, we’d know it immediately and have solutions in place to thwart the attack.”

For additional protection, organizations use Cradlepoint solutions to enable Parallel Networking, which keeps credit card and other sensitive data completely separate or “air-gapped” from other applications and third-party networks.

Healthcare Technology Improves Patient Experience

The present and future of 4G LTE-enabled healthcare networking is bright. For instance, robotics is poised to emerge as a major tool for patient care—potentially affecting everything from the distribution of medication to exoskeletons enabling paraplegics to walk.

For now, practitioners and patients alike are reaping the benefits of 4G LTE connectivity making healthcare more accessible, efficient, and flexible than ever before.

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Source: Cradlepoint