Tag Archives: autonomous vehicles

Cao Cao and DeepRoute Form Autonomous Driving Partnership

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Cao Cao and DeepRoute Form Autonomous Driving Partnership Ahead of Hangzhou 2022 Asian Games

DeepRoute’s new Level 4 self-driving system will be used in Cao Cao’s autonomous robo-taxis service at the multisport event

DeepRoute, an international self-driving vehicle technology provider, and Cao Cao Mobility, a strategically invested business of Geely Technology Group, are pleased to announce the companies’ partnership to advance the design, development and commercialization of Cao Cao’s Level 4 autonomous robo-taxis service.

The autonomous vehicles, powered by DeepRoute’s innovative self-driving technology solution, will be deployed at the 2022 Asian Games in Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

Cao Cao will integrate DeepRoute’s new Level 4 full-stack self-driving system, including its second generation sensing system, DeepRoute-Sense II, into its dedicated fleet of Geometry A fully electric vehicles at the multisport event. The autonomous robo-taxis represent a new milestone in Cao Cao and Geely’s vision to usher in a fully autonomous future where transportation is safer and more efficient. Asian Games athletes and guests will be able to use the Cao Cao app to seamlessly hail these vehicles to get around the event sites.

DeepRoute’s new, second generation sensing system, DeepRoute-Sense II, will transform Cao Cao’s fleet of electric vehicles into robo-taxis with advanced self-driving capabilities. DeepRoute’s comprehensive system provides vehicles with every component needed for Level 4 self-driving technology – including sensing, HD mapping, perception, planning and control, simulation system and cloud technology.

The slim, water-resistant roof-box design for DeepRoute-Sense houses seven DeepRoute-Vision vehicle cameras, three LiDAR sensors, a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) with two GPS antennas, and other advanced sensors. The system also integrates a telecommunication and data synchronization controller to accurately synchronize data from the different sensors in real time. With built-in 5G support, DeepRoute-Sense gives companies the ability to remotely control vehicles so operators can take over a vehicle’s driving system if needed. Plus, 5G capabilities will be essential for future vehicle-to-vehicle communication networks in smart cities. This fully integrated design makes it easier for companies to quickly and safely test and deploy autonomous vehicle fleets around the world.

“Our partnership with DeepRoute reinforces our shared vision of making transportation safer, connected and accessible as we work together to develop the highest-performing and safest autonomous vehicles,” said Jinliang Liu, chairman of Cao Cao Mobility. “As the chief partner of the 2022 Asian Games, we are excited to have the athletes and guests experience riding in autonomous robo-taxis, which will be be the primary mode of transportation in the not-so-distant future.”

“It is an honor to be working alongside automotive giant Geely and Cao Cao to demonstrate our innovative self-driving technologies at the upcoming 2022 Asian Games,” says Nianqiu Liu, vice president of DeepRoute. “Our second generation DeepRoute-Sense system will help drive this new era of transportation forward with our comprehensive self-driving technologies integrated into one compact design for easy integration and deployment.”

Source: DeepRoute

Georgia lab takes autonomous vehicle infrastructure testing to the streets

The newly opened Infrastructure-Automotive Technology Laboratory (iATL) in Alpharetta, Georgia, provides a hub for automakers, cellular network operators, traffic control device companies and semiconductor manufacturers to create, develop and test connected vehicle safety applications in real-world conditions.

The 4,400-square-foot facility includes dozens of different types of electronic devices that control everything from traffic signals and school zone safety beacons to electronic crosswalks. Automakers will be able to develop safety apps that interact with the devices and cellular network operators will work out communications, including 5G.

Real-world conditions

Through the iATL, automakers can test safety applications in the streets of Alpharetta, which operates the first large-scale deployment of connected vehicle infrastructure technology using all forms of communications simultaneously – 4G LTE, Cellular Vehicle to Everything (C-V2X), Dedicated Short Range Radio (DSRC) and 900 MHz radio, underwritten by the North Fulton Community Improvement District.

“The iATL is not just a collection of traffic devices in a laboratory, but it is embedded in an ecosystem of 125 connected intersections to test the day-one applications in real-world conditions”

“The iATL is where automakers, roadway operators and technology companies can come together and make the vision of connected vehicles a reality now,” said Bryan Mulligan, president of Applied Information Inc. “The iATL is not just a collection of traffic devices in a laboratory, but it is embedded in an ecosystem of 125 connected intersections to test the day-one applications in real-world conditions.”

 

 

The rubber hits the road

The opening day began with a workshop outlining policy and plans for connecting smart cars to a smart infrastructure and was attended by government leaders, roadway operators and representatives of the automotive, cellular network and technology industries.

“The iATL is a prime example of Georgia’s leadership in developing critical technology that is so important to our state and national economies while at the same time improving the safety of all of us who use our streets and highways today,” said Georgia Lt Gov. Geoff Duncan. “I am particularly pleased that this incredible facility is privately sponsored and enjoys the overwhelming support of the local government and surrounding business community – where the rubber meets the road.”

“The ability of vehicles to communicate with the traffic control infrastructure is crucial to improving roadway safety and for the rapid adoption of connected vehicle technology across the fleet,” added Jovan Zagajac, head of connected vehicle technology for Ford Motor Company.

Source: Sarah Wray. Smart Cities World

Addison Lee And Oxbotica To Accecerate Autonomous Vehicle Implementation In London

Addison Lee Group And Oxbotica Join Forces In Strategic Alliance To Make Self-Driving Services A Reality In London

View More: http://photographybypeltier.pass.us/addison-lee-tylney-hall-2018

Addison Lee Group, the global ground transportation business, and Oxbotica, the British leader in self-driving vehicle software, have agreed a wide-ranging strategic alliance that accelerates the implementation of autonomous vehicles to London’s streets.

Under the agreement, the two companies will collaborate on the development, deployment and operation of autonomous vehicles with a view to providing customers self-driving services in London by 2021.

The long-term aim is to take greater share of an expanding car services market for connected autonomous vehicle technology, forecasted to be worth £28 billion in the UK by 2035*. Addison Lee Group aims to use its trusted brand to offer affordable, quality, ride-shared services to passengers currently underserved by existing driven transport modes, as well as explore opportunities to provide corporate shuttles, airport and campus-based services.

Addison Lee Group and Oxbotica, both British success stories, will pool expertise, technology and on-the-ground resource to explore self-driving car services that are safe and environmentally friendly, and which still deliver the exceptional customer experiences Addison Lee Group is known for.

The companies will work together to create detailed, digital maps of more than 250,000 miles of public roads in and around the capital. These maps will record the position of every kerb, road sign, landmark and traffic light in preparation for the deployment of autonomous cars.

Mobility Opportunity

With private car ownership declining at the same time city populations are expanding, consumers are increasing their use of car services. Added to that, the global transport services market is experiencing significant growth – specifically for the premium segment, which shows strong growth of up to 21 per cent by 2030*.

This provides an opportunity for focused investment in future-looking technologies that, alongside traditional driven vehicles, will help meet this need. By leveraging the strengths of each partner, the alliance will open new opportunities to reach consumers in new markets and segments starting in London, following into New York and other international markets.

Graeme Smith, CEO of Oxbotica, said: “This represents a huge leap towards bringing autonomous vehicles into mainstream use on the streets of London, and eventually in cities across the United Kingdom and beyond.

“Our partnership with Addison Lee Group represents another milestone for the commercial deployment of our integrated autonomous vehicle and fleet management software systems in complex urban transport conditions. Together, we are taking a major step in delivering the future of mobility.”

Andy Boland, CEO of Addison Lee Group, said: “Urban transport will change beyond recognition in the next 10 years with the introduction of self-driving services, and we intend to be at the very forefront of this change by acting now.

“Autonomous technology holds the key to many of the challenges we face in transport. By providing ride-sharing services, we can help address congestion, free space used for parking and improve urban air quality through zero-emission vehicles. We are proud to be partnering with a British technology pioneer and leader in autonomous vehicle technology, Oxbotica, and together we will continue our British success story in how we revolutionise the way people get around cities.”

Addison Lee Group recently set up and led the MERGE Greenwich consortium, a government-funded project investigating how autonomous vehicle ride-sharing could be introduced to complement existing public transport services. Using the London Borough of Greenwich as a model, the project found that by 2025, self-driving, ride-shared services could assist significantly with addressing the capital’s transport challenges and make it easier and more accessible for citizens to move around. In parallel, Oxbotica is leading the DRIVEN consortium, and has already launched a fleet of vehicles currently running autonomously in public trials in London and Oxford.

Source: Addison Lee

 

Data-gathering cars to hit London streets ahead of autonomous trials

 

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UK company FiveAI has been given the go-ahead to deploy data-gathering cars on London’s streets to pave the way for a potential driverless car service.

FiveAI plans to spend the next 10 months deploying five cars (with drivers on board) in Bromley and Croydon to collect data on roads, including layout, topology and traffic flow, as well as road user behaviour. The data collected will be processed in line with General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and used to feed into the development of FiveAI’s planned services.

FiveAI notes that all its data collection vehicles will be clearly branded and feature an “obvious array” of sensors to ensure transparency.

Towards trials

The shared service the company is working on will target commuters who drive at least part of their journey. FiveAI hopes to run a supervised trial of autonomous vehicles in London in 2019.

FiveAI co-founder Ben Peters says that autonomous vehicles will be much safer than human-driven cars and the data-gathering exercise is a crucial stage towards getting them onto the roads.

He commented: “By supporting London’s transport objectives with a shared driverless car service, FiveAI can play a crucial role in reducing congestion, emissions, incidents and the cost and time of journeys to benefit all Londoners.”

5G and autonomous vehicles

Some say that autonomous cars will only be a reality when we have 5G. Elsewhere, alongside data-gathering initiatives such as FiveAI’s, trials are ongoing to ensure that 5G connectivity will be in place to support driverless cars in the future.

For example, at Millbrook Proving Ground in Bedford, as part of the AutoAir project, led by Airspan Networks, advanced 5G test networks are being deployed to validate connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) technologies. The researchers are focused on areas such as complicated cell-tower hand-offs and issues related to bandwidth. They are also looking at how the work they are doing on 5G connectivity could be transferred to road and rail systems.

Meanwhile, government mapping agency, Ordnance Survey (OS), is leading an initiative to help better understand the infrastructure needed to support a nationwide network of CAVs. The E-CAVE project will run for four years and will focus on the geospatial aspects of how CAVs exchange safety-related messages between themselves and the supporting environment.

OS is also working with the 5G Innovation Centre and the Met Office on a digital twinning tool to help determine the best places to put radio antennae to underpin a 5G network.

Source: Sarah Wray www.5g.co.uk

Driverless Vehicles Demoed in Formula E

 

Roborace unveiled its Robocar at MWC’s ‘Connected Vehicles’ keynote, with CEO Denis Sverdlov stating the initiative will push the industry to improve driverless and autonomous vehicles.

He also believes driverless car racing will help people accept robots on the street, and is a great way to show the public the benefits of artificial intelligence (AI).

“It was very important for us that we created an emotional connection to driverless cars and bring humans and robots closer together to define our future,” he said.

Software engineers will be the “true heroes” of the initiative, which is a “fair competition” of intelligence rather than budget, as all teams have the same Robocar to work with – in order to win they have to focus entirely on the software.

So far, Roborace has performed demos with ‘Devbots’, which completed 12 driverless laps in Morocco. Despite a recent crash, Sverdlov is confident in the technology, adding that accidents will only help improve learning.

The car, designed by Daniel Simon, who created vehicles for Hollywood sci-fi films like Tron Legacy, uses a number of technologies to drive itself including two radars and six AI cameras, and makes up to 24 trillion AI operations per second.

The Roborace series takes place on Formula E city street circuits.

Alejandro Agag, CEO of Formula E, said all the big auto companies, like Audi, Renault and Mahindra, want their teams to win and this pushes them to invest resources into improving electric cars, and this will play a big role in boosting the autonomous car industry.

Source: Mobile World Live

TSC Autonomous Vehicle demonstration a success

TSC and Oxford University operated the vehicle in full autonomous mode around a public area

TSC and Oxford University operated the vehicle in full autonomous mode around a public area

The TSC has successfully tested its self-driving vehicles in public for the first time in the UK. The demonstration of a UK developed autonomous driving system marked the conclusion of the LUTZ Pathfinder Project, which has been developing the technology for the past 18 months.

The project team has been running a number of exercises in preparation for the demonstration as part of the LUTZ Pathfinder project, including virtual mapping of Milton Keynes, assessing public acceptance, conducting the necessary safety planning and establishing the regulatory environment with the support of Milton Keynes Council.

The autonomy software running the vehicle, called Selenium, was developed by Oxford University’s Oxford Robotics Institute and integrated by Oxford University spinout company Oxbotica on to an electric vehicle. Selenium uses data from cameras and LIDAR systems to navigate its way around the environment.

The vehicle demonstration took place on pavements around Milton Keynes train station and business district. In the future it is expected that vehicles like those demonstrated in Milton Keynes will be used for local transportation in urban areas.

Neil Fulton, Programme Director at the TSC explained:

“This public demonstration represents a major milestone for autonomous vehicles in the UK and the culmination of an extensive project involving UK companies and experts. Oxford University’s technology will go on to power automated vehicles around the world and the LUTZ Pathfinder project will now feed into a much wider programme of autonomous trials across the UK. Driverless vehicles are coming to Britain and what we have demonstrated today is a huge step on that journey”

Following the trial, the TSC’s Automated Transport Systems team will continue to research the challenges and promote the benefits of increased automation in transport. Fulton commented,

“Through the LUTZ Pathfinder project we have started to create a world leading urban test bed for connected and automated vehicles. We can now capitalise on the unique position of having the environment and the development platform to conduct further research and trials.

To that end we have started work building an automated vehicle test and integration facility, which will enable other UK universities and SMEs to work with the Catapult on new self-driving technology.”

Further quotes and comments

Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark said:

“Today’s first public trials of driverless vehicles in our towns is a ground-breaking moment and further evidence that Britain is at the forefront of innovation.

“The global market for autonomous vehicles present huge opportunities for our automotive and technology firms. And the research that underpins the technology and software will have applications way beyond autonomous vehicles.”

Graeme Smith, CEO at Oxbotica:

“The TSC’s Lutz pathfinder project is a great example of Oxbotica’s autonomy software leading the way for self-driving vehicles here in the U.K.  This is a landmark step to bringing self-driving vehicles to the streets of the UK and the world. Our unique Selenium software gives vehicles the next generation level of intelligence to safely operate in pedestrianised urban environments.”

“Our leading team of UK-based scientists, mathematicians and engineers have worked incredibly hard to develop this ground-breaking technology, which is bringing self-driving vehicles yet another a step closer to deployment across the world.”

Professor Paul Newman, BP Professor of Information Engineering at Oxford University and co-founder of Oxbotica:

‘It’s great to see our research ideas having a life of their own beyond the lab and being used in public, for the public. Our work with the TSC has given us the opportunity to accelerate the development of our system into the public domain and has given us a platform from which we can now take our expertise onto the world stage.’

Source: TSC

Uber rethinks autonomous transportation with Otto acquisition

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Uber has acquired Otto, a 90-plus person technology startup whose mission is to rethink transportation, starting with self-driving trucks. Anthony Levandowski, Otto’s co-founder, will now lead Uber’s combined self-driving efforts reporting directly to Travis Kalanick—across personal transportation, delivery and trucking—in San Francisco, Palo Alto and Pittsburgh.

If that sounds like a big deal—well, it is. More and more the world of atoms is interacting with bits. In order to provide digital services in the physical world, we must build sophisticated logistics, artificial intelligence and robotics systems that serve and elevate humanity.

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When it comes to this advanced technology stack, Otto plus Uber is a dream team. Anthony is one of the world’s leading autonomous engineers: his first invention, a self-driving motorcycle called Ghostrider, is now in the Smithsonian. Just as important, Anthony is a prolific entrepreneur with a real sense of urgency.

Together, we now have one of the strongest autonomous engineering groups in the world; self-driving trucks and cars that are already on the road thanks to Otto and Uber’s Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh; the practical experience that comes from running ridesharing and delivery services in hundreds of cities; with the data and intelligence that comes from doing 1.2 billion miles on the road every month.

In the last six years we’ve seen the profound impact that smartphone technology has had on transportation, as well as the delivery business. When people can push a button and reliably get an affordable ride across town, things change for the better—and quickly. Ridesharing helps cut drunk driving. It complements public transit, getting people to places that other means of transportation don’t reach, replacing the need to own a car over time. Most important of all, the smartphone has made mass carpooling a reality. By getting more people into fewer cars, we can reduce congestion and pollution in our cities.

Of course, this is just the start, especially when it comes to safety. Over one million people die on the world’s roads every year and 90 percent of these accidents are due to human error. In the US, traffic accidents are a leading cause of death for people under 25. This is a tragedy that self-driving technology can help solve. That’s why our partnership with Swedish car maker Volvo, which we’re also announcing today, is so important. Volvo has consistently been a leader when it comes to safety. And partnership is crucial to our self-driving strategy because Uber has no experience making cars. To do it well is incredibly hard, as I realized on my first visit to a car manufacturing plant several years ago. By combining Uber’s self-driving technology with Volvo’s state-of-the art vehicles and safety technology, we’ll get to the future faster than going it alone.

Here’s to a great partnership with Volvo. And to Anthony, Lior and the Otto team—welcome to Uber. We’re pumped to have you on board. It’s time to move.

Source: Travis Kalanick, CEO and Co-Founder, Uber

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AI software startup FiveAI raises £2.06M to power autonomous vehicles

 

 

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FiveAI, an AI software startup targeting autonomous vehicles, has raised £2.06 million in funding in a round led by Amadeus Capital Partners with participation from Spring Partners and Notion Capital.

The company is aiming to utilise the latest in computer vision and AI/machine learning to ensure self-driving cars comprehend and navigate their immediate environment. FiveAI plans to reach simulator and supervised road testing before raising a larger amount of funds. The startup will then begin working with vehicle OEMs to develop production-ready software.

The funding will be used to improve its autonomous vehicle software stack and grow its team of AI/machine learning and other software engineers. FiveAI wants to use AI/machine learning and computer vision to eliminate the requirement for highly detailed “prior 3D mapping” of environments. The startup’s software stack, used along with a range of onboard sensors/cameras aims to allow autonomous vehicles to safely and accurately navigate even complex urban environments with much simpler maps.

“Amadeus is very excited by the investment opportunity arising from advances in autonomous vehicles,” said Hermann Hauser, Amadeus Capital co-founder and partner. “FiveAI has a world-class technology founding team which we have backed three times before and which has successfully build and exited companies worth over £1 billion.”

Hauser added: “We’re excited to support this team in building a European powerhouse for autonomous vehicle technology, through the use of machine learning and state of the art university research to revolutionise the guidance systems for autonomous vehicles.”

Source: Connected Car

JAGUAR LAND ROVER TO START REAL-WORLD TESTS OF INNOVATIVE CONNECTED AND AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY

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Jaguar Land Rover plans to create a fleet of more than 100 research vehicles over the next four years, to develop and test a wide range of Connected and Autonomous Vehicle (CAV) technologies. The first of these research cars will be driven on a new 41 mile test route on motorways and urban roads around Coventry and Solihull later this year.

  • New research fleet will begin real-world tests in the UK
  • New technology aims to reduce driver stress and help prevent accidents
  • ‘Roadwork Assist’ will help steer drivers through roadworks and contraflows
  • ‘Safe Pullaway’ will prevent accidents
  • Cars will communicate with other cars from ‘over the horizon’
  • Drivers will be alerted that an emergency vehicle is approaching – long before they see or hear it

Jaguar Land Rover plans to create a fleet of more than 100 research vehicles over the next four years, to develop and test a wide range of Connected and Autonomous Vehicle (CAV) technologies. The first of these research cars will be driven on a new 41 mile test route on motorways and urban roads around Coventry and Solihull later this year.

The initial tests will involve vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications technologies that will allow cars to talk to each other and roadside signs, overhead gantries and traffic lights. Ultimately, data sharing between vehicles would allow future connected cars to co-operate and work together to assist the driver and make lane changing and crossing junctions easier and safer.

Our connected and automated technology could help improve traffic flow, cut congestion and reduce the potential for accidents. We will also improve the driving experience, with drivers able to choose how much support and assistance they need. In traffic, for example, the driver could choose autonomy assist during tedious or stressful parts of the journey. But even when an enthusiastic driver is fully focussed on enjoying the thrill of the open road, the new technology we are creating will still be working in the background to help keep them safe. Because the intelligent car will always be alert and is never distracted, it could guide you through road works and prevent accidents. If you are a keen driver, imagine being able to receive a warning that there’s a hazard out of sight or around a blind bend. Whether it’s a badly parked car or an ambulance heading your way, you could slow down, pass the hazard without fuss and continue on your journey.

ROADWORK ASSIST uses a forward-facing stereo camera to generate a 3D view of the road ahead and together with advanced image processing software, it can recognise cones and barriers. The system will sense when the vehicle is approaching the start of the roadworks, identify an ideal path through complicated construction sites and contraflows, and inform the driver that the road is narrowing ahead. The system will then apply a small amount of steering assistance to the wheel to help the driver remain centred in lane.

Driving through congested roadworks can be a stressful experience for many people – especially when the lanes narrow and switch to the other side of the road, or if road markings are faint, obscured or missing. To overcome this, our prototype system will guide the vehicle to the centre of the narrow lane, reducing driver workload and stress. With further research, in the future this system could enable the car to drive autonomously through road works.

SAFE PULLAWAY: Getting too close to the vehicle in front in traffic jams or when entering junctions is a common cause of accidents. Low-speed collisions can also be caused by drivers hitting walls, garage doors or parked cars because they mistakenly put the vehicle into drive instead of reverse when attempting to pull away.

Jaguar Land Rover is developing an assistance system to prevent these types of collisions. Called Safe Pullaway, it uses the stereo camera to monitor the area immediately in front of the vehicle. If objects such as vehicles or walls are detected, and the system receives signals from throttle pedal activation or from gear selection that could lead to a collision, the vehicle brakes are automatically applied and the driver receives an audible warning.

OVER THE HORIZON WARNING is part of a research project testing devices that use radio signals to transmit relevant data from vehicle to vehicle. If vehicles were able to communicate independently, drivers and autonomous cars could be warned of hazards and obstacles over the horizon or around blind bends.

Over The Horizon will make driving safer and could help prevent traffic jams and accidents. Providing the right information at the right time will enable better and safer decision-making, whether the car is driven by a human or is autonomous

If a vehicle has slowed or stopped, and poses a risk to other motorists, it would send a ‘Hazard Ahead’ warning to nearby vehicles. Approaching vehicles will then receive a visual and audible warning, informing the driver of the hazard.

Hearing the siren of an emergency vehicle but not being able to see which direction the vehicle is coming from can be stressful. Giving drivers the right information at the right time will also enable better and safer decision-making, and could reduce the potential for accidents.

Emergency Vehicle Warning allows connected ambulances, police cars or fire engines to communicate with other vehicles on the road: a device in the emergency vehicle would broadcast that it is approaching before the driver could see or hear flashing lights and sirens.

Drivers would receive an audible warning along with a visual alert telling them the direction the emergency vehicle is coming from and how far away it is: they can then safely pull over and allow the emergency vehicle to pass, which will minimise delays for the emergency services and prevent accidents.

Source: Jaguar Land Rover

 

 

EU Says Automated Vehicles Need ‘Driving Tests’

 

Automatic-Car-GoogleEU rules on safety approvals for new cars will need to be revised to include ‘driving tests’ for automated and fully-autonomous vehicles according to a new report from the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC).

ETSC says the EU is far from answering the many research and regulatory questions that must be considered before automated and autonomous vehicles can be put on sale. The report says the priority must be ensuring that the promised safety benefits are delivered in real world driving.

One challenge will be ensuring that autonomous cars sold in Europe are capable of following national road rules in 28 EU countries – hence the need for a comprehensive ‘driving test’ to independently verify that vehicles will operate safely under all conditions.

Many questions remain over how autonomous vehicles will interact with other human-driven vehicles as well as vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists according to the report.

Antonio Avenoso, Executive Director of the European Transport Safety Council said:
“Automated vehicles are already starting to appear on Europe’s roads, but regulators are still stuck in the slow lane. It is crucial that we get a much greater understanding of what the real world safety benefits would be, and what new risks would be introduced before these vehicles are put on sale.“

In the short term, ETSC is calling on the EU to require mandatory installation of effective and proven driver assistance systems including Automated Emergency Braking and overridable Intelligent Speed Assistance in all new cars, and to develop a new EU framework for approving future automated technologies as well as fully autonomous vehicles.

As well as safety approval rules for new cars, the report says EU driving license regulations will need to be updated to reflect the need for drivers to learn how to safely take back command from automated driving systems. EU rules on road infrastructure safety should also be revised to include requirements for automated and semi- automated vehicles such as clear road markings.

ETSC also says carmakers must apply full openness and transparency in disclosing collision data for automated vehicles in order that the information can be used to help prevent future collissions.

Earlier this year, the European Commission’s industry department launched ‘Gear 2030’ a high-level expert group to address future development of the automotive industry including issues related to automated driving. ETSC is represented on the group, and has emphasised that promotion of automated technologies must be based on sound evidence of safety benefits.

Source: ETSC