Category Archives: IoT

Goanna Ag uses IoT to improve water management on Australian farms

Goanna Ag launches first-of-its-kind sensors to provide water management visibility for Australian farmers

ADELAIDE, South Australia, Aug. 6, 2019 – Goanna Ag has partnered with Myriota to develop a remote monitoring, low-cost farm sensor solution for Australian farmers. The solution will tackle one of Australian agriculture’s biggest challenges: the management and optimisation of on-farm water use.

Combining Goanna Ag’s deep experience in farm sensors with Myriota’s direct-to-orbit satellite network for the Internet of Things (IoT), the partnership will unlock the power of remote monitoring at a price and scale never seen before.

Making the most of every drop of precious water is a challenge that Australian farmers have been dealing with for decades. This has been compounded by the impact of one of the worst droughts in living memory; with water management being brought into stark view across the farming community this year.

Monitoring rainfall and water storage is a critical requirement to better understand and manage what is going on across the farm. Traditionally, this monitoring has required regular trips to check rain gauges and water tank levels; a necessary evil rather than an efficient and sustainable solution.

In the past decade, remote monitoring has emerged as a far more efficient approach, but the relatively high cost of hardware and communications, complexity of data, less than robust sensors and a lack of field support has prevented widespread adoption.

Partnering with Myriota to develop an ‘everywhere’ monitoring solution for Australian agriculture, GoannaAg has deployed a small number of rain gauges and water tank monitoring devices as part of a trial on Australian farms. Now, the tried and tested solution is on the verge of commercial release with pricing and distribution currently being finalised.

The gauges’ data management and app access provide a more affordable solution than other  alternatives, with units set to include three years of connectivity, data management and app access as standard.

Future iterations of the rain gauges will see Goanna Ag integrate smart functionality, including point specific weather forecasting generated by the Bureau of Meteorology, aggregated and granular rainfall mapping, and an initial on-the-go yield forecaster for dryland cropping.

Tom Dowling Chief Operating Officer at Goanna Ag said that the suite of products has been in development for some time.

“Our clients know the value that comes from remote monitoring, but until now, the industry has been restricted by coverage and cost issues,” Dowling said.

“We have been working toward a solution like this for over a decade, and thanks to our partnership with Myriota, have developed a game changing solution that will drive on farm efficiencies – particularly around water management and optimisation.”

Tom Dowling, Chief Operating Officer, Goanna Ag

Business Development Executive at Myriota, Tom Rayner, echoed Goanna Ag’s sentiments, saying that the partnership is already achieving strong results for farmers.

“We are able to provide an ‘everywhere’ communication solution that is ideally suited to agriculture,” Rayner said.

“With ground based communications requiring capital and geographical prioritisation, there will be ‘black spots’ where data is lost, but through this collaboration with Goanna Ag, we have been able to overcome these challenges of cost and connectivity.”

Tom Rayner, Business Development Executive, Myriota

Both Myriota and Goanna Ag are in the process of expanding their respective capabilities to deliver more sensors and satellites to solve problems facing the industry where real-time insights are critical.

Goanna Ag is now taking pre-orders for their rain gauge and tank monitoring solutions, with commercial sales set for October this year.

Source: Myriota

 

Co-Star supply DIGI 4G Wireless Routers for ESN and IoT deployments

 
 
 
Delivering Scalable Solutions for What’s Next
 
Co-Star supply Digi wireless routers for ESN and IoT deployments.
 
DIGI 4G router available from Co-Star

Co-Star supply DIGI wireless routers for IoT deployments

 
Since 1985, Digi International Inc. (Digi) has been a pioneer in wireless communication, forging the future for connected devices and responding to the needs of the people and enterprises that use them.
 
Before the Internet of Things was a thing, Digi built M2M and IoT devices, adapted to evolving network standards, and optimized data communications around the most advanced protocols and emerging technologies. From radio frequency modems to gateways, cellular routers, networking devices, embedded system-on-modules (SOM) and single-board computers (SBCs), Digi’s solutions have continually grown to serve the full breadth of applications across the IoT landscape.
 
Today, Digi’s IoT offering includes sensor-based solutions, a sophisticated platform for remotely monitoring device deployments of any size, anywhere, as well as professional design, implementation and certification teams to help you carry out your vision, no matter how large or small.
 
Digi Work Where Data Moves
 
From vast oil fields and evolving cities to intensive care units and factory floors, Digi connect the millions of sensors, valves, and components that allow these critical infrastructures to carry out their tasks. Even in the most demanding environments, Digi provides the essential layer of remote monitoring and management that IoT (Internet of Things) communications depend on.
Our customers are pushing the boundaries of their industries and exploring the possibilities for what’s next. They have innovative ideas, big problems to solve, and aggressive goals. Budgets are tight, deadlines are looming, and their success depends on the ability to make smarter decisions faster. That’s where Digi comes in.
 
Digi puts proven technology to work for our customers so they can connect complex networks and take new products from ideation to deployment. We bring visions and innovations to life with machine connectivity that’s relentlessly reliable, secure, scalable, and manageable. That’s Digi.
 
For more information on the Digi range of wireless routers available from Cloud-Star Technology click here>
 
Source: Digi/Co-Star

Bad Cars: Anatomy of a Ransomware Attack

TV and science fiction writers have let their imaginations run wild with theories about what could happen if your car was attacked by bad actors. There have been a few real-world cases where white-hat hackers and researchers have been able – in limited, controlled instances – to actually penetrate a car’s electronics and communications systems, take over the car’s steering and acceleration systems, and potentially do real damage.

However, there are other scenarios that might not be as obvious or as dramatic.

For example, what if your car’s computer was infected by a virus that greatly reduced the engine’s efficiency or capped the car’s maximum driving speed? What if the virus did something less dramatic, such as make the car unable to lock the controls for automatic window operation, or simply prevent the car from starting? No one would die, but the car owner would be very upset, posing a disaster for the automobile’s manufacturers.

Motor City Ransomware

Electric Vehicles require sophisticated control and safety technologies for their electrical power systems to safely manage the high voltages that store and distribute from their battery systems. If something goes wrong, the car cannot operate, people could get electrocuted, or the car could burst into flames or explode. These are real dangers that are managed by the car’s network of fuses, circuit breakers, and control systems.

What would happen if a cyber hacker got into these sensitive electronic systems and turned off the safety and control system?

Why would someone do this? Money, of course.

Suppose the bad guys successfully penetrated and infected these vehicles? Imagine now that they had the software or security keys that could fix these problems, but hold them as ransom, jeopardizing an automaker’s entire fleet of new cars.

How many millions (or tens of millions) of dollars would the automaker pay to get that solution? Holding a manufacturer hostage is a very real possibility, as evidenced by the results that today’s hackers are getting by attacking hospitals and cities and successfully extracting substantial ransoms to just return these institution’s data. In a recent WIRED article, The Biggest Cybersecurity Crisis of 2019 So Far, which discusses the risks to “things” and across supply chains, the FBI explained, “We are seeing an increase in targeted ransomware attacks. Cyber criminals are opportunistic. They will monetize any network to the fullest extent.”

Pre- and Post-Assembly Infections

It is possible that cars could be infected before they even hit the auto dealers’ lots. Bad actors have the capability to infect a small electronic part, essential to the auto manufacturing food chain, purchased from one of the hundreds of component suppliers.

How could auto manufacturers possibly test each electronic element? It is almost impossible – and requires that parts manufacturers themselves take more care in their software development process to ensure the software in these components are not infected during manufacturing process, or during the testing and shipping processes.

Of course, cyber infections could happen on the actual assembly line where the cars are put together. With many car manufacturing plants using IoT connected robots and machines, there is always a possibility of infection happening on the assembly line.

These components could even become infected after assembly, during the manufacturers’ testing and process. Infection, during installation, or with after-market parts and upgrades, could arise after the vehicles arrive at the dealers’ facilities.

Already aware of the possibility and the potential disastrous effects of infected cars reaching the market, manufacturers throughout the supply chain need to become more aware of how their devices could be attacked and infected even before they leave the warehouse. This means embedding IoT security from day one – from the smallest electronic components to final assembly of motors, transmissions and other large vehicle components.

Source: Alan Grau, VP of IoT, Embedded Systems, Sectigo

How Organizations can get the most out of their IoT Investment

Internet-of-Things-1920xx

The Internet of Things has ushered in a sea change in a variety of business sectors. It’s driving positive change: lower waste, higher efficiency, a more joined-up supply chain, and a more proactive approach to outages. In 2019, these changes are impacting a wide range of industries, as demonstrated by the variety of conference tracks available at Internet of Things World in Santa Clara this month.

At the same time, our adoption of IoT at work (following our widespread adoption at home) is rapidly increasing the number of devices connected to the internet. The numbers are already phenomenal and are set to grow quickly. Connected, active IoT devices are predicted to number 10 billion by 2020, and 22 billion by 2025. As businesses adopt the new tech in ever-increasing numbers, competitors will catch on; the advent of AI will also give us more ways to use the data that’s flowing in from our sensors.

This welcome investment in IoT over the next five to six years should give rise to huge efficiency gains, benefiting businesses, consumers, and — potentially — the planet. What could possibly go wrong?

How Secure is IoT Really?

An IoT device is no different to any other network-connected device. In itself, IoT is not risky. But it can pose risks in specific situations.

Consider a router on your network that is rarely checked for new firmware. As the router’s software ages, and it falls behind the update cycle, it becomes more appealing to hackers who have figured out how to get around its security.

IoT is no different. A poorly-managed IoT deployment generates significant risks and the sheer number of devices just multiplies the risk; there’s a whole lot of maintenance to plan for. Without ongoing investment into security, all of this new hardware is setting us up for a fall unless we understand the importance of keeping it secure.

Same Old Same Old?

In actual fact, IoT security is no more exotic than general network security — there’s just a lot more of it. Each device is a potential weak point that could be exploited if it wasn’t correctly secured. For example, every device needs to run the latest manufacturer firmware, and each one needs to have a unique password that’s difficult to guess.

Some of the techniques in use to secure IoT deployments are relatively straightforward. According to industry figures, 45% of companies have decided to use a dedicated network for IoT, keeping the sensors siloed from the wider company network. That’s a sensible move. It’s also sensible to look at physical security, monitoring, and access. Where are your sensors? Who can get to them? If someone installed unwelcome software on the network via a rogue device, how quickly would you know?

All of this points to a need for much wider investment in training and skills so that there are enough people ready to provide the necessary maintenance and technical support. Again, a high proportion of businesses are working towards this; 46% say they’re rolling out internal training for everyone — not just those in IT roles.

Final Thoughts

Digital transformation has taught us valuable lessons about technology adoption. In the rush to move to the cloud, some businesses failed to keep their migrations reigned in tight. Shadow IT wreaked havoc as employees found their own solutions. BYOD led to malware infection and uncontrolled data transfer.

As we start the process of embedding IoT (and, soon, AI), we’re in the fortunate position of having learned lessons from mistakes of the past. With IoT, we now know that achieving staff buy-in will be key across every organization and sector. Businesses would do well to remember that these devices are not ‘set and forget’. So, while early adoption is great — and should ensure a head start on competitors — it would be unwise to roll out a slew of IoT sensors without the people who are well training in how to maintain them.

Additionally, we’ve learned that ensuring cyber security it isn’t just a case of providing tech support when things go wrong, although that is important. It’s also about engineering the required culture change so that everyone knows how important cyber security is and keeps it top of mind once IoT is successfully deployed.

Source: Zach Butler. IoT World.

BT to deliver Smart Water IoT with Northumbrian Water

 

BT has secured a contract with Northumbrian Water, the providers of reliable and sustainable water, to help deliver a Smart Water project across its North East operating area.

BT is providing the low power network and data which will enable operational insights, allowing the water company to better understand how its water network performs using the Internet of Things (IoT). The Smart Water project aims to provide Northumbrian Water with a wide range of insights to allow the company to address issues such as water leakage, and enhance levels of water quality for its customers.

The Smart Water project will be deployed over three distinct areas of Sunderland. Around 150 sensors will be installed across the network to capture data on a range of factors, including water flow, pressure and quality. By monitoring the performance of the water network, the project will equip Northumbrian Water with the operational insights needed to continue to provide an excellent customer experience.

The data collected by the sensors will be connected to the BT’s LoRaWAN (Low Power, Long Range, Wide Area Network), which is designed to support long-life, battery powered IoT devices over a long distance. This makes it an ideal solution for monitoring performance across Northumbrian Water’s vast water network.

BT’s IoT platform will be used to capture, process and visualise the data received from the sensors. The platform will help to provide Northumbrian Water with the data insights it needs to understand how the water network is functioning, so that it can take proactive steps to reduce water leakage, speed up operational processes and lower its total running and maintenance costs.

Nigel Watson, Group Information Services Director for Northumbrian Water, said: “We’re delighted to be working with BT on this pilot project in Sunderland, which is just another example of how we apply innovation to our everyday work. It represents a real step forwards towards the Smart Water network of the future transforming the level of insight we have into our network’s operations and driving improvements for customers.

“The idea first came out of our Innovation Festival and the innovative technology that BT uses made them a great choice of partner for developing and delivering our Smart Water pilot project. We’re keen to understand whether it can be rolled out across our entire North East network to deliver benefits for all of our customers.”

Chris Sims, Managing Director, Strategy, Marketing and Digital at BT, said: “We are really excited to be deploying our IoT platform and LoRaWAN network to provide the connectivity and insight needed to deliver a truly integrated Smart Water network for Northumbrian Water.

“It’s a great example of how the Internet of Things can be used to deliver a better experience to customers. And with 5G on the horizon, which will provide benefits such as lower latency, higher speeds and greater reliability, we’re thrilled to work with one of the most innovative water companies in the UK to fully realise the transformational benefits of IoT.”

BT is dedicated to bringing innovative IoT solutions to market using its expertise in devices, connectivity and platforms. The Northumbrian Water Smart Water project is one of a number of recent IoT deployments by BT across the Smart Cities, utilities, transport, logistics and retail sectors.

Source: BT

MANN HUMMEL partners with Sierra Wireless for predictive maintenance in vehicles

MANN+HUMMEL Senzit predictive maintenance platform provides real-time reporting to reduce equipment damage and repair costs, enabled by Sierra Wireless Smart SIM and AirVantage® IoT Platform

Sierra Wireless, the leading provider of fully integrated device-to-cloud solutions for the Internet of Things (IoT), today announced that MANN+HUMMEL, a leading global expert for filtration solutions, has selected Sierra Wireless’ Smart SIMs and AirVantage® IoT Platform to connect and manage global deployments of Senzit, the company’s new predictive maintenance platform developed to increase uptime for industrial and agricultural fleets.

Internet-of-Things-1920xx
The buildup of dust in a vehicle engine’s air filter can cause massive damage and lead to expensive repairs or replacements. With the cost of an engine replacement often exceeding $100,000 for industrial and agricultural vehicles, monitoring air filters and engine health is critical to operations.

MANN+HUMMEL’s Senzit solution uses IoT connectivity services from Sierra Wireless to ensure fleet managers have full visibility into their fleet’s dust load, engine hours and equipment location. With Senzit’s real-time monitoring capabilities, fleet managers can schedule maintenance only when vehicles require it, avoid unnecessary downtime due to engine damage and accurately track a vehicle’s operating hours and location – all through a mobile app and web portal.

“Our customers rely on Senzit to provide up-to-date, accurate information about their vehicle’s dust load and remaining filter lifetime,” said Charles Vaillant, chief technology officer, MANN+HUMMEL. “By working with Sierra Wireless to add IoT connectivity to our solution, we’re helping fleet managers reduce downtime and save as much as $4,200 per machine, per year. Our customers have an average fleet size of 150-200 vehicles, creating significant savings that they can reinvest in their business.”

To connect and manage their solution, MANN+HUMMEL chose Sierra Wireless’ Smart SIMs and AirVantage IoT Platform. The Smart SIM’s global coverage and remote operator provisioning capabilities allow MANN+HUMMEL to quickly and easily deploy their predictive maintenance platform worldwide, without changing the device’s SIM card. With intelligent network selection and resilience to outages, Smart SIMs ensure that Senzit stays online and fleet operators stay connected. To manage all subscriptions and connectivity through a single pane of glass, the SIMs are integrated with the AirVantage IoT Platform. The platform’s management interface with customizable alerts enables MANN+HUMMEL’s customers to increase uptime and reduce waste with real-time machine data.

“MANN+HUMMEL needed an IoT partner that could help them integrate, scale and manage reliable global connectivity,” said Marc Overton, senior vice president and GM of IoT Services, Sierra Wireless. “Our solution connects their devices in the field and delivers actionable insights to a cloud platform, ensuring that MANN+HUMMEL can offer a responsive, easy-to-use predictive maintenance platform to improve their customers’ bottom lines.”

Source: Sierra Wireless

Pubinno Chooses Quectel Modules to Develop Smart Tap for Perfect Beer

Pubinno Chooses Quectel Modules to Develop Smart Tap for Perfect Beer

It mostly seemed to be a marketing slogan when a few years ago elites were talking about how IoT can concur in every corner of plant earth as it can basically be embedded in everyTHINGS.Nowadays we are not surprised if even strange THINGS are connected, but beers in pubs could have been the last one we thought of. But pioneers like Pubinno are among those who redefines how a business can operate by pushing into new frontiers.

Mr. Necdet Alpmen, CTO & co-founder at Pubinno said:
“Pubinno is a San Francisco based technology company, developing Smart Beer Taps that serve perfect beer and boost profits.”

“Pubinno’s leading product, Taptronics™, is a plug & play, smart and connected draft beer tap combining robotics, IoT and AI. Taptronics™ delivers rich and smooth foam that produces a wonderful drinking experience.”

He added that:
“As a fast-growing company, Pubinno is working closely with the largest beer brands in the world such as InBev Turkey. Pubinno’s products are being used over 200+ bars and pubs across USA, Germany, Italy, India, Israel, Netherlands, Turkey and more to come. A total of 300.000 glasses are being served monthly through Taptronics™. Quectel was a very natural choice as it offers quality, competitive price and incredible service at once. We also loved Quectel for its commitment and clear yet smooth migration path from 2G toward NB-IoT. Backward compatibility with newer technology; which saves tremendous amount of cost and engineering efforts; is also considered as additional advantage of using Quectel modules.”

Quectel M66 is an ultra-small quad-band GSM/GPRS module using LCC castellation packaging on the market. It has the optimal performance in SMS & Data transmission and audio service even in harsh environment. The ultra-compact 15.8mm × 17.7mm × 2.3mm profile makes it a perfect platform for size sensitive applications.

smart beer tap with Quectel M66“Industrial 4.0 revolution is not a theoretical concept anymore. In fact, related products and services are being widely used in almost all industries and even penetrated into micro retailing, and as seen, food and beverages sector. This is indeed a turning point in human being history,”said Mr. Onur Canıtez, Quectel Regional Sales Director, Turkey & Middle East.

He added that:
“At Quectel, we are overwhelmingly excited to be part of this revolution by offering communication cores thanks to our richest product portfolio in the cellular connectivity market, from 2G and NB-IoT all the way to 5G and beyond.”

Quectel owns a broad portfolio of cellular modules and will showcase the latest LPWA products at booth B.j40 of the upcoming European Utility Week (EUW) during 6-8 November in Vienna.
Soure: IoT Business News

New U-Linc IoT device protocol could transform hotel stays

U-Linc

U-Linc, a new Internet of Things (IoT) device protocol which has been developed at the University of Surrey’s 5G Innovation Centre, could dramatically improve the experience of staying at a hotel.

One of the key challenges with smart home applications and similar smart device implementations, such as those which could be used in hotels, is that users typically need a different app for each type of technology – e.g. lighting, heating, security, etc., and this leads to a disjointed customer experience.

U-Linc,  a next-generation protocol likened to Bluetooth, allows users to access and control numerous IoT devices from different manufacturers via one interface. When users decide to operate an IoT device via U-Linc, a branded interface is created for that device. Device manufacturers retain control over the customisation.

Professor David Sampson, Vice-Provost of Research and Innovation at the University of Surrey, said: “We are proud that U-Linc was developed here at the University of Surrey’s 5G Innovation Centre. U-Linc is indicative of the forward and enterprising thinking that we encourage our researchers to adopt.  We are excited to see how this product develops in the years to come.”

Hotel of the future

U-Linc’s creators believe the protocol could have applications in a number of industries, including hospitality, potentially enabling hotels to offer unique experiences for each guest as well as the ability to better manage guest access to hotel rooms, areas and facilities.

A number of hotel chains are eyeing the opportunities offered by the IoT. Late last year, Hilton announced its Connected Room concept, noting that the ‘mobile-centric hotel room’ idea was based on the fact that hotel guests have limited time in their rooms. The experience should be seamless and they don’t have time to learn a lot of new technology each time they check in.

Marriott has also launched the IoT Guestroom Lab to explore the hotel room of the future, including responsive IoT systems to personalise the experience and streamline operations.

User-friendly IoT

SAS predicts that the IoT will be worth £81 billion in the UK alone by 2022. As new devices come onto the market and more areas of life become connected, the need for a user-friendly interface will increase. A protocol such as U-Linc could also have applications in retail, smart cities, industrial settings and connected cars.

U-Linc can be used via a software licence or provided embedded within a chip.

Source: Sarah Wray-5g.co.uk

Düsseldorf Airport: Ready for takeoff with smart sensor technology

Deutsche Telekom: Düsseldorf Airport: Ready for takeoff with smart sensor technology

  • Internet of Things (IoT) by Deutsche Telekom supports smooth flight operations.
  • Access road to central tank farm equipped with smart sensor technology.
  • Networking of transport infrastructure is growing in importance.
IoT

Düsseldorf Airport is one of the most important German hubs in international air traffic. In future, digital processes will play a role in successfully handling its more than 24 million passengers annually. Intact, reliable traffic routes and the construction infrastructure form the foundation of these processes. The airport has teamed with Deutsche Telekom and its partner BS2 Sicherheitssysteme to develop a digital monitoring solution for bridges, tunnels, buildings, and other infrastructure objects made of concrete.

Bridge transmits over the IoT

The access road to the airport’s tank farm is a neuralgic point for smooth flight operations. A bridge provides the sole access route to the farm. More than 120 fuel tank trucks, carrying 30,000 liters of kerosene each, commute daily over this stretch of road between runway and container tanks. This enormous load causes material fatigue in the long term. In the future, sensors and the Internet of Things will identify impending damage, preventing bottlenecks in supplying kerosene to the aircraft. 50 sensors in the road surface and bridge copings measure temperature, humidity, and corrosion. This sensor data can help identify critical conditions or irreparable damage to the concrete structures. The renovation measures can be extensive. The data is exchanged over Deutsche Telekom’s machinery and sensor network (Narrowband-IoT) nearly in real time.

The transportation infrastructure is getting smart

“Previously, material samples were needed to gain information about a building’s condition – a complex method that usually involved destruction,” says Michael Hohenecker, Head of Data Management and Building Inspection at Real Estate Management, Düsseldorf Airport. “We have a bottleneck here at the central tank farm. The digital solution protects us against unforeseeable damage to the access road and the disruptions to tank usage that it would entail.”

Other roads around the Düsseldorf Airport are also being equipped with sensors, step by step. The installed sensors have a lifetime of up to 70 years. They can be installed quickly and easily in new construction products or retrofitted in existing concrete structures.

“Düsseldorf Airport is one of the pioneers in Germany that is using IoT technology for its road constructions at the airport,“ says Ingo Hofacker, responsible for IoT business at Deutsche Telekom. “Networking of transport infrastructure is growing in importance. The new network of equipment and sensors is an ideal foundation for data transmission.”

Sensible Sensors – intelligent bridges: IoT live to see at Düsseldorf airport

IoT

Another place where sensors from BS2 Sicherheitssysteme are being deployed is the Köln-Ost junction, where Germany’s Federal Highway Research Institute (BASt) is testing the sensors on their Cologne test grounds, together with Deutsche Telekom’s equipment and sensor network. BS2 Sicherheitssysteme was born in hub:raum, Deutsche Telekom’s startup incubator.

Due to the special properties of the narrowband technology for the Internet of Things (Narrowband IoT), it is an enabler for the IoT. Deutsche Telekom is driving its expansion in Germany, Europe, and North America.

Source: Deutsche Telekom

UK market leader delivers rooftop media screens to London cabs

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Brightmove Media (www.brightmovemedia.com) is the UK market leader in real-time digital moving media. Formed in 2013, the organisation has broken new ground by becoming the first Transport for London (TFL) regulated service to deliver rooftop media screens onto London cabs. As a technology media platform, Brightmove has integrated in-built intelligence triggers enabling the dispersal of messages that are geo-targeted, time sensitive, dynamic and highly flexible. This is particularly important for Brightmove’s two main audiences – advertisers who can now utilise a vibrant and far-reaching medium with reduced wastage and improved ROI, and Transport for London, who have exclusive rights to the enabled taxis for public messaging.

The technology behind Brightmove Media is also ahead of the industry curve. Each system uses a private and secure link via 3G cellular networks to stay in constant contact with the centralised media platform that can push out new or updated content in real-time. The system also maintains location awareness via GPS, allowing advertisers to tailor their campaigns and messaging to specific geographic locations.

The design and development has been fully executed in house by BrightMove’s team, giving the organisation opportunity to blend expertise with experience and produce a reliable product that is both innovative yet simple to install, operate and manage. By working closely with the regulator, Brightmove helped develop a high benchmark of technical, operational and safety requirements, helping to set the industry standard going forward.

Source: Brightmove Media