Category Archives: Autonomous Vehicles

HYUNDAI MOTOR COMPANY INTRODUCES NEW AUTONOMOUS IONIQ CONCEPT AT AUTOMOBILITY LOS ANGELES

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Hyundai Motor Company Presents Self Driving Vehicle with Hidden LiDAR

Hyundai have announced the introduction of the Autonomous IONIQ concept during its press conference at Automobility LA (Los Angeles Auto Show). With a sleek design resembling the rest of the IONIQ lineup, the vehicle is one of the few self-driving cars in development to have a hidden LiDAR system in its front bumper instead of on the roof, enabling it to look like any other car on the road and not a high school science project.

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The goal of the autonomous IONIQ concept was to keep the self-driving systems as simple as possible. This was accomplished by using the production car’s Smart Cruise Control’s forward-facing radar and Lane Keeping Assist cameras, which are integrated with LiDAR technology. Hyundai is also developing its own autonomous vehicle operating system, with the goal of using a lot less computing power. This will result in a low-cost platform, which can be installed in future Hyundai models the average consumer can afford.

The car’s hidden LiDAR system also allows the Autonomous IONIQ to detect the absolute position of surrounding vehicles and objects. In addition, the Autonomous IONIQ features:

  • Forward Facing Radar which detects the relative location and speed of objects in the vehicle’s forward path to aid in route planning
  • A three camera array which detects pedestrian proximity, lane markings and traffic signals
  • A GPS antenna to determine the precise location of each vehicle
  • High definition mapping data from Hyundai MnSoft which delivers location accuracy, road grade/curvature, lane width and indication data
  • A Blind Spot Detection radar to ensure even simple lane changes are executed safely

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These features build upon the capabilities of the product IONIQ, which offers Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection, Smart Cruise Control, Lane Departure Warning and Rear Cross-Traffic Assist. The vehicle also incorporates all autonomous controls into existing systems to ensure that drivers can have a seamless transition between active and self-driving modes.

Earlier this year, Hyundai Motor earned a license to test its autonomous cars in urban environments. Hyundai Motor is currently testing three autonomous IONIQs and two Autonomous Tucson Fuel Cell vehicles at Hyundai Motor Research and Development Center in Namyang, South Korea.

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To showcase its autonomous vehicles in action, Hyundai Motor will debut two autonomous IONIQs at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January 2017 where the cars will be found driving up and down the neon-and sunlit boulevards of Las Vegas. The testing in Las Vegas will build upon the Hyundai’s current efforts to bring the most adept and safest self-driving car to market.

In addition to offering media rides, these IONIQs will be prepared to tackle:

  • High levels of pedestrian traffic
  • Stop lights, stop signs and school zones
  • Road construction and roadblocks
  • Speed bumps
  • Dogs without a leash
  • Children at play
  • Shopping centers
  • Intersections without traffic signals

Source: Hyundai

 

When will we see driverless cars on UK roads? Lords to investigate

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The House of Lords Science and Technology Committee will continue its inquiry investigating driverless vehicles on Tuesday 8 November. The Committee will hear evidence from European Officials and industry experts.

This session provides an opportunity for the Committee to hear from representatives from three driverless car trials in Greenwich, Bristol and Milton Keynes. The Committee will be able to explore the progress being made by the trials and the issues they have highlighted relating to the deployment and regulation of driverless cars as well as social and behavioural issues.

The Committee will also examine the extent to which the UK will have to align itself with future international regulation for self-driving vehicles in areas such as cyber-security and data handling and will assess what progress has been made in European and global regulation of autonomous vehicles.

At 10:40am the Committee will hear from:

  • Ms Claire Depré, Head of Sustainable & Intelligent Transport Unit, DG Transport and Mobility
  • Dr Hermann Meyer, CEO, ERTICO –EUROPE
  • Mike Hawes, Chief Executive, Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders

The Committee are likely to ask:

  • What can European organisations deliver that individual Member States or organisations cannot deliver on their own?
  • What ways is it possible to avoid a situation where European countries have their own individual approach to cybersecurity and privacy requirements for highly autonomous vehicles?
  • To what extent can the UK devise its own regulations and standards?

At 11:40am the Committee will hear from:

  • Professor Nick Reed, Greenwich Automated Transport Environment
  • John McCarthy, Bristol Driverless Cars Project
  • Brian Matthews, Head of Transport Innovation, Milton Keynes Council

The Committee are likely to ask:

  • Are you demonstrating a scientific or engineering process or testing elements of a system to be deployed?
  • Has there been modelling or simulation of deployment on a network of a mixed fleet of non-highly and fully-automated vehicles?
  • Can these new types of vehicle operate safely, efficiently and effectively on current infrastructure or will there have to be significant new infrastructure investment?

The evidence session will take place in Committee room 4A on Tuesday 8 November in the House of Lords at 10:30am.

Source: UK Parliment

UK Autodrive Completes First Collaborative Autonomous Vehicle Trials

Jaguar Land Rover's vehicle completes an automated overtake during Friday's demonstration.

Jaguar Land Rover’s vehicle completes an automated overtake during Friday’s demonstration.

 

The UK’s first collaborative trials of connected and autonomous vehicle technology were successfully completed on Friday, as UK Autodrive partners Jaguar Land Rover, Ford and Tata Motors European Technical Centre (TMETC) jointly demonstrated a number of future vehicle technologies at HORIBA MIRA’s Proving Ground in Nuneaton.

Friday’s demonstration came at the end of a fortnight trials, in which the three vehicle manufacturers were able to successfully demonstrate the programme’s first two connected car features.

The first demonstration showcased cars that can warn their drivers when another connected car up ahead has braked severely, lowering the risk of rear-end collisions when the driver’s view is obscured, for example, by fog or other vehicles.

The second demonstration showed how connected cars can be sent information from traffic lights, allowing them to reduce the likelihood of meeting red lights – potentially improving future traffic flow and lowering emissions in urban areas.

“There has already been a lot of public focus on self-driving vehicles, but connected car technology may be just as revolutionary,” said Tim Armitage, Arup’s UK Autodrive project director.

“The benefits of having cars that can communicate with each other and their surroundings could be very significant – from increased road safety to improved traffic flow, more efficient parking and better information for drivers.”

Jaguar Land Rover also used Friday’s event to demonstrate a self-driving Range Rover Sport that was able to overtake slower moving vehicles automatically – and also reject overtake requests if it detects another vehicle in the occupant’s “blind spot”.

A Ford test driver receives a brake light warning triggered by the Jaguar ahead of him.

A Ford test driver receives a brake light warning triggered by the Jaguar ahead of him.

The UK Autodrive demonstration was also welcomed the UK’s Roads Innovation Minister, John Hayes, who said: “This technology has the potential to revolutionise travel by making journeys safer and cutting congestion for motorists. I’m proud that the UK is a world leader when it comes to developing connected and automated vehicles, and we are further establishing ourselves as the place to test and invest in this emerging technology.”

 

Further UK Autodrive trials and demonstrations are scheduled to take place at HORIBA MIRA during the spring of next year, before moving out onto closed-off areas of Milton Keynes and Coventry in late 2017. The project will culminate in a series of open road trials and demonstrations to be held in both cities in 2018.

Jaguar Land Rover's vehicle completes an automated overtake during Friday's demonstration.

Jaguar Land Rover’s vehicle completes an automated overtake during Friday’s demonstration.

The driver of the TMETC vehicle receives a speed advisory to help reach a green light.

The driver of the TMETC vehicle receives a speed advisory to help reach a green light.

JAGUAR LAND ROVER DRIVES FORWARD CONNECTED AND AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES

 

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Jaguar Land Rover showcased its latest Connected and Autonomous Vehicle technologies as part of the UK Autodrive demonstrations taking place at HORIBA MIRA today.

 

In a UK first Jaguar Land Rover collaborates with other manufacturers to trial new connected technologies that allow cars to talk to each other

  • Connected and Autonomous Vehicle technologies will help make driving safer and cleaner in the future
  • Showcasing three research technologies, including a car that knows what speed to travel at to ensure traffic lights are always on green

Coventry, UK: Jaguar Land Rover showcased its latest Connected and Autonomous Vehicle technologies as part of the UK Autodrive demonstrations taking place at HORIBA MIRA today. In a UK first, Jaguar Land Rover is working with Ford and Tata Motors European Technical Centre to test connected technologies that will allow cars to talk to each other as well as the roadside infrastructure, such as traffic lights, in the future.

Connected and Autonomous Vehicle technologies are one of Jaguar Land Rover’s research priorities. It is creating a fleet of more than 100 research vehicles to develop and test a wide range of Connected and Autonomous Vehicle technologies over the next four years. Ultimately, these technologies will enhance the driving experience as well as making driving smarter, safer and even cleaner in the years to come.

We know that there’s a huge potential for these technologies in future vehicles around the world. Until now we have focused on communication between Jaguar and Land Rover vehicles, this collaborative approach is a major stepping stone towards all Connected and Autonomous Vehicles co-operating with each other in the future. Our aim is to give drivers exactly the right information at the right time and collaborations with other manufacturers are essential to help us deliver this commitment to our customers.

TONY HARPER
HEAD OF RESEARCH, JAGUAR LAND ROVER,

Jaguar Land Rover is developing both fully and semi-autonomous vehicle technologies to help the driver with the challenging or more tedious parts of driving whilst maintaining an enjoyable driving experience. The company’s vision is to make the autonomous car viable in the widest range of real life, on and off road driving environments and weather conditions.

Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Technologies

With Advanced Highway Assist the vehicle can overtake vehicles automatically as well as stay in its lane on the motorway without the driver having to touch either the steering wheel or the pedals.

Electronic Emergency Brake Light Assist warns drivers when a vehicle ahead brakes severely or unexpectedly. This is particularly useful when driving in dense fog or if the vehicle in front is out of sight.

Imagine travelling across central London or Paris without needing to stop at traffic lights because they are always on green. This could be possible with Green Light Optimal Speed Advisory. The car connects to traffic lights advising the driver of the best driving speed required to reach the lights when they are on green. This will improve traffic flow, CO₂ emissions as well as the driver’s experience.

UK Autodrive

UK Autodrive is a consortium of leading technology and automotive businesses, local authorities and academic institutions working together on a three year UK trial of self-driving vehicle and connected car technologies. It is helping to establish the UK as a global hub for the research, development and integration of automated and connected vehicles into society. It will also investigate other aspects of automated driving, including safety and cyber-security issues as well as the public’s acceptance for connected and autonomous vehicles.

Source: JLR

 

 

 

TSC Autonomous Vehicle demonstration a success

TSC and Oxford University operated the vehicle in full autonomous mode around a public area

TSC and Oxford University operated the vehicle in full autonomous mode around a public area

The TSC has successfully tested its self-driving vehicles in public for the first time in the UK. The demonstration of a UK developed autonomous driving system marked the conclusion of the LUTZ Pathfinder Project, which has been developing the technology for the past 18 months.

The project team has been running a number of exercises in preparation for the demonstration as part of the LUTZ Pathfinder project, including virtual mapping of Milton Keynes, assessing public acceptance, conducting the necessary safety planning and establishing the regulatory environment with the support of Milton Keynes Council.

The autonomy software running the vehicle, called Selenium, was developed by Oxford University’s Oxford Robotics Institute and integrated by Oxford University spinout company Oxbotica on to an electric vehicle. Selenium uses data from cameras and LIDAR systems to navigate its way around the environment.

The vehicle demonstration took place on pavements around Milton Keynes train station and business district. In the future it is expected that vehicles like those demonstrated in Milton Keynes will be used for local transportation in urban areas.

Neil Fulton, Programme Director at the TSC explained:

“This public demonstration represents a major milestone for autonomous vehicles in the UK and the culmination of an extensive project involving UK companies and experts. Oxford University’s technology will go on to power automated vehicles around the world and the LUTZ Pathfinder project will now feed into a much wider programme of autonomous trials across the UK. Driverless vehicles are coming to Britain and what we have demonstrated today is a huge step on that journey”

Following the trial, the TSC’s Automated Transport Systems team will continue to research the challenges and promote the benefits of increased automation in transport. Fulton commented,

“Through the LUTZ Pathfinder project we have started to create a world leading urban test bed for connected and automated vehicles. We can now capitalise on the unique position of having the environment and the development platform to conduct further research and trials.

To that end we have started work building an automated vehicle test and integration facility, which will enable other UK universities and SMEs to work with the Catapult on new self-driving technology.”

Further quotes and comments

Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark said:

“Today’s first public trials of driverless vehicles in our towns is a ground-breaking moment and further evidence that Britain is at the forefront of innovation.

“The global market for autonomous vehicles present huge opportunities for our automotive and technology firms. And the research that underpins the technology and software will have applications way beyond autonomous vehicles.”

Graeme Smith, CEO at Oxbotica:

“The TSC’s Lutz pathfinder project is a great example of Oxbotica’s autonomy software leading the way for self-driving vehicles here in the U.K.  This is a landmark step to bringing self-driving vehicles to the streets of the UK and the world. Our unique Selenium software gives vehicles the next generation level of intelligence to safely operate in pedestrianised urban environments.”

“Our leading team of UK-based scientists, mathematicians and engineers have worked incredibly hard to develop this ground-breaking technology, which is bringing self-driving vehicles yet another a step closer to deployment across the world.”

Professor Paul Newman, BP Professor of Information Engineering at Oxford University and co-founder of Oxbotica:

‘It’s great to see our research ideas having a life of their own beyond the lab and being used in public, for the public. Our work with the TSC has given us the opportunity to accelerate the development of our system into the public domain and has given us a platform from which we can now take our expertise onto the world stage.’

Source: TSC

Autonomous cars expected to hit 24 million units by 2030, says Berg Insight

(c)iStock.com/chombosan

A new research report from Berg Insight says the first autonomous cars will debut in 2020, and predicts that the total number of new registrations of autonomous cars will grow at a CAGR of 62% from 0.2 million units in 2020 to reach 24 million units in 2030.

As the analyst firm explains, cars are among the costliest as well as one of the most inefficiently used assets today, but when operated around the clock on a service based business model can results in a tremendous potential increase of their utilisation rate. Moreover, autonomous cars will potentially improve the quality of life for the people who are unable to drive, reduce the number of fatalities and accidents in road traffic and increase overall traffic efficiency.

That’s the theory, at any rate. The research notes that the active installed base of autonomous cars is estimated to have reached about 71 million at the end of 2030, including SAE Level 3 and 4 cars.

The report states that the key to the development of self-driving cars lies in the software that will interpret sensor information and manage the driving logic. In order to further develop the autonomous technology, many new actors such as IT firms and other technology-oriented companies have joined incumbent automakers who have already initiated projects to develop self-driving features in their cars.

Ludvig Barrehag, M2M/IoT analyst at Berg Insight, said: “These pathways do not contradict each other as different autonomous systems are suitable in different use cases. We will continue to see development from both sides for still some years before the two approaches converge.”

Source: Connected Car/Berg Insight

An electrically powered, automated and fully interconnected van from Mercedes-Benz Vans revolutionises last-mile delivery services

  • Mercedes-Benz Vision Van - Exterior

    Mercedes-Benz Vision Van – Exterior

    Mercedes-Benz Vision Van – Interior

    Mercedes-Benz Vision Van – Interior

    Van as an integrated concept in a completely digitally connected supply chain on the last mile of the delivery process

  • Fully automated cargo space, integrated delivery drones, unique communication between vehicle and its surroundings
  • Local emission-free and virtually silent delivery
  • Intelligence of a cutting-edge logistics centre integrated in a van
  • Integrated concept opens up new options for same-day and time-definite parcel delivery
  • Spectacular design provides an idea of future generations of vans
  • Efficiency gains in delivery operations of up to 50 percent

 

The Vision Van from Mercedes-Benz Vans is a revolutionary van study for the urban environment. As an integrated system, the vehicle merges a number of innovative technologies for last-mile delivery operations and thus sets the standard of performance requirements and solutions for future generations of vans.

The Vision Van evolved as part of the strategic future initiative adVANce. With adVANce, Mercedes-Benz Vans is evolving from a mere van manufacturer into a supplier of holistic system solutions. The company is underscoring this strategy with the Vision Van as a visible manifestation of its innovative strength. The Vision Van boasts an unprecedented level of connectivity of information and technologies. It is the first van worldwide to serve as an integrated concept for a completely digitally connected process chain, from the goods distribution depot to the consignee.

The Vision Van features a fully automated cargo space, integrated drones for autonomous air deliveries and a state-of-the-art joystick control. Powered by a 75 kW electric drive system with a range of up to 270 km, deliveries with the Vision Van are locally emission-free. The electric drive system additionally guarantees that it will remain possible to operate the Vision Van in inner-city zones where the introduction of bans on vehicles with internal combustion engines is planned. The virtually silent electric drive system facilitates late deliveries in residential areas for the purposes of same-day delivery.

“With the Vision Van we are presenting the intelligent, clean and fully interconnected van of the future”, says Volker Mornhinweg, Head of Mercedes-Benz Vans. “The Vision Van integrates many concrete concepts for future delivery operations in the urban environment, such as a fully automatic cargo space, autonomously flying delivery drones and innovative communication features.”

Cloud-based control software meets optimum cargo hardware

The Vision Van merges numerous innovative technologies and serves as the central, intelligent element in a fully connected delivery chain. Innovative algorithms control order picking, the loading of packages, the fully automated cargo space management, route planning for the vehicle and the delivery drones. They also calculate ideal delivery routes for the package deliverer. Automatic order picking takes place at the logistics centre, for example, and consignments are loaded into special racking systems. Driverless handling vehicles load the racks by way of an automated one-shot loading process. The intelligent cargo space management system automatically transfers packages for manual delivery to the deliverer at the delivery destination by means of a package dispenser on board the vehicle. At the same time, the system supplies two drones, each with a payload capacity of two kilogrammes, with consignments for autonomous delivery within a radius of 10 km.

The combination of a cloud-based control software and optimum hardware yields substantial time and efficiency benefits and raises the quality and flexibility of delivery services in the urban environment to a new level. The delivery time per package and the vehicle’s curbside time are markedly reduced, for example. The vehicle also opens up new options for same-day and time-definite delivery. Convenience for the end customer is thus enhanced, and failed delivery attempts become an exception. One-shot loading, the automation technology in the cargo space and integration of the delivery drones all contribute to the described increases in efficiency. The technology also virtually rules out any false deliveries.

“With the Vision Van we are integrating the intelligence of a state-of-the-art logistics depot into a van”, Volker Mornhinweg points out. “We estimate that this vehicle would enable an increase in productivity of up to 50 percent in last-mile delivery services.”

Vehicle communicates with the driver and its surroundings

The futuristic design by Mercedes-Benz Vans provides a foretaste of future generations of vans. It fuses the vehicle’s intelligence, efficiency and connectivity in an unprecedented manner. The front design alone is enough to transport the beholder into the distant future. The face is defined by the extremely wide windscreen, which curves around to the sidewalls like a high-tech visor, the Black Panel radiator grille with integrated LED matrix via which the Vision Van communicates with its surroundings and the progressively designed LED headlamps. The sharp contours of these elements contrast with the vehicle’s smooth surfaces, engaging in a fascinating dialogue between passion/emotion and technology/functionality. The vehicle communicates with its surroundings via LED displays on the front and rear. Warnings appear when the delivery drones take off, when the vehicle stops or when the deliverer alights, for example.

Being pared down to a maximum level of functionality the interior design comes in a highly futuristic guise. The designers have done without a steering wheel, pedals and centre console in favour of drive-by-wire control by means of a joystick, thereby creating new design options. This results in a unique interior centring on intelligent communication between driver and vehicle. It has also been possible to move the driver’s seat further forward to enlarge the vehicle’s useful floor space.

The dashboard in the shape of a broadly sweeping arc is covered with a premium textile and extends across the entire front end. The entire surface of the arc is used to provide the driver with all the information he needs for his work. When the Vision Van is in stand-by mode, the arc appears as a continuous blue surface with a black colour gradient. When the vehicle is in operation, the arc lights up and shows a tachometer, route planning information and drone flight data, for example.

The vehicle also communicates with the driver via the cabin floor. By way of a special effect LED indicators shine in the stainless steel floor, signalling to the driver whether pedestrians or cyclists are approaching, for example. At the rear wall of the driver’s cabin are the package dispenser and the driver’s info terminal providing all the relevant information on the delivery process. This terminal serves as a means of communication between the Vision Van’s autonomously functioning system environment and the driver, who is able to concentrate fully on the manual delivery task at hand. It also performs the role of a central control unit to interlink the intelligent vehicle, the automated systems and the information relating to the delivery orders to be carried out.

At the same time, the interior concept also facilitates the driver’s work procedures. The omission of a steering wheel, pedals and centre console provides for freedom of movement in the driver’s cabin and ensures unimpeded entry into and exiting from the vehicle. The electric drive system does away with the need for a drive line, making it possible to provide the driver’s cab with a level floor. The on-board package dispenser spares the driver the time-consuming and strength-sapping task of searching for and resorting consignments in the cargo space. The driver is able to take receipt of packages at the dispenser in an ergonomically ideal position.

Please click here to see a video of the van in action> 

Source: Daimler

Lyon becomes the first City to introduce driverless shuttles for public transport

 

The French city of Lyon has become the world’s first city to introduce driverless shuttles for public transport. The driverless minibuses manufactured by the French firm Navya after a year long experiment to use the vehicle as a mode of daily transport by local residents.

The two vehicles launched by the company are fitted with high-tech equipment including laser sensors, stereo vision and GPS, can ferry around 15 passengers at a top speed of 20 kilometres an hour. The vehicles have been tested without passengers in other French cities and in Switzerland, and a trial is under way in Dubai, using a bus developed with the help of a French company.

Costing 200,000 euros (USD 225,000) a piece, the prototype of this electric vehicle was tested in the year 2013. In Lyon, the 4-metre-long buses attracted curious onlookers who took ‘selfies’ beside the vehicles, which allow passengers to stand at the front and enjoy the journey from a “driver’s eye view”.

While the buses are manufactured with latest technology, they are not capable of manoeuvring around other traffic and the routes are near a tramway where other vehicles are not allowed.

Christophe Sapet, chief executive of the Navya company which designed the buses, said
“They’re equipped with a range of detectors that allow them to know exactly where they are and to detect everything happening around them and to manage it intelligently to avoid collisions”.

Each minibus is equipped with lasers, cameras and electronic systems that detect and analyse any movement around it. Navya has taken about 30 orders for the vehicles and plans to develop larger buses able to carry 20 passengers.

Source: Telematicswire

nuTonomy launches World’s first public trial of autonomous Taxi’s in Singapore

 

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nuTonomy Launches World’s First Public Trial of
Self-Driving Car Service and Ride-Hailing App

nuTonomy, the leading developer of state-of-the art software for self-driving cars, today launched the first-ever public trial of a robo-taxi service. The trial, which will continue on an on-going basis, is being held within Singapore’s one-north business district, where nuTonomy has been conducting daily autonomous vehicle (AV) testing since April.

Beginning today, select Singapore residents will be invited to use nuTonomy’s ride-hailing smartphone app to book a no-cost ride in a nuTonomy self-driving car that employs the company’s sophisticated software, which has been integrated with high-performance sensing and computing components. The rides will be provided in a Renault Zoe or Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric vehicle that nuTonomy has specially configured for autonomous driving. An engineer from nuTonomy will ride in the vehicle to observe system performance and assume control if needed to ensure passenger comfort and safety.

Throughout the trial, nuTonomy will collect and evaluate valuable data related to software system performance, vehicle routing efficiency, the vehicle booking process, and the overall passenger experience. This data will enable nuTonomy to refine its software in preparation for the launch of a widely-available commercial robo-taxi service in Singapore in 2018.

Earlier this month, nuTonomy was selected by the Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) as an R&D partner, to support the development of a commercial AV service in Singapore. This trial represents the first, rapid result of this partnership. nuTonomy is the first, and to date only, private enterprise approved by the Singapore government to test AVs on public roads.

CEO and co-founder of nuTonomy, Karl Iagnemma, said, “nuTonomy’s first-in-the-world public trial is a direct reflection of the level of maturity that we have achieved with our AV software system. The trial represents an extraordinary opportunity to collect feedback from riders in a real-world setting, and this feedback will give nuTonomy a unique advantage as we work toward deployment of a self-driving vehicle fleet in 2018.”

In May of this year, nuTonomy completed a $16M Series A funding led by Highland Capital Partners that included participation from Fontinalis Partners, Signal Ventures, Samsung Ventures, and EDBI, the dedicated corporate investment arm of the Singapore Economic Development Board.

In addition to Singapore, nuTonomy is operating self-driving cars in Michigan and the United Kingdom, where it tests software in partnership with major automotive manufacturers such as Jaguar Land Rover.

To see nuTonomy in action please click the link below:

https://youtu.be/Fp13jIr8Y7E

Source: nuTonomy

 

 

Autonomous buses trialed in Helsinki

Robobus in Helsinki

Automated EasyMile EZ10 buses entered Helsinki, Finland on 16th August as the Deputy Mayor of HelsinkiPekka Sauri gave the opening words for the project kick-off. At the event more than hundred members of municipalities, media, technology companies, citizens and other communities were seated to test-drive the urban vehicles.

The robobuses will be on a trial use in the cities of Helsinki, Espoo and Tampere in via SOHJOA-project coordinated by Metropolia University of Applied Sciences.

The Finnish Transport Safety Agency Trafi grants permissions for safe automatic transportation trials. Through these piloting cases the aim is to find best solutions for city traffic, safety and user experience for the future’s automated buses. The Finnish transportation legislation has given a true international competitive advantage for all the developers of the automated transportation. In the SOHJOA Project this legislative advantage is implemented for the first time in practical use by the businesses developing technologies and services as well as cities involved in the project.

In September, the buses will be tested in Espoo area. In this September’s trial the bus route will be longer and traffic profile differs from the first test environment in Helsinki.

The project’s main goal is to provide possibilities for Finnish companies to develop new product and service ideas in the open innovation platform, aiming towards road traffic automation. The aim is to set Finland to the development fast lane of automated road transport systems and to create new export businesses. The project provides an innovation platform where the businesses may provide their products to be developed and tested as partial solutions for the robot buses.

On September 23rd, 2016 the buses will be seen in Espoo at Aalto University’s Design Factory. There is also a workshop for those interested in the possibilities of the innovation platform.

Source: Metropolia University of Applied Sciences.