Category Archives: ADAS Automated Driving

Japanese Ministry leads Connected Car Cybersecurity initiative

connected-car

 

Japan’s Internal Affairs and Communications Ministry has drawn up guidelines in a bid to defend against the hacking of an envisaged next-generation driving support system that is expected to help accelerate the development of autonomous driving cars.

The ministry is concerned about the possibility that a cyberattack on the system might lead to traffic accidents.

The ITS (Intelligent Transport Systems) Connect Promotion Consortium, which is developing the system with the government, plans to establish specifications on the technology to prevent such cyberattacks in autumn this year, sources familiar with the matter said. The consortium is made up of automakers and electronics-makers.

The system is aimed at helping ensure safe driving by distributing information on nearby automobiles and pedestrians, traffic signals and other relevant matters collected through radio communications to moving vehicles. The vehicles will alert the drivers to possible dangers.

The consortium will consider encrypting such information by using special technologies to prevent it from being altered, the sources said.

The next-generation driving support system is also expected to improve automatic emergency braking technologies for preventing collisions.

Autonomous driving uses such equipment as an on-vehicle camera and sensor that collect information on the surrounding environment, with related technologies being developed by automakers and electronics-makers.

The planned next-generation driving support system is being touted as a way to strengthen the safety of autonomous driving by providing information on blind spots, the sources said.

Toyota Motor Corp. is considering introducing equipment compatible with the system in a planned fully remodeled version of its Prius hybrid vehicle and other vehicle models.

Source: Japan Times/Telematics Info

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Audi develops high-resolution technology for improved driver efficiency

Audi utilizes high-resolution navigation maps for its driver assistance systems

  • Highly precise data leads to greater convenience and better fuel economy
  • Predictive efficiency assistant in the Audi Q7* achieves up to ten percent fuel savings
  • Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, Board Member for Technical Development: “High-resolution maps are continuing to gain in importance.”
Virtual Cockpit
Virtual Cockpit

The premium brand is developing a new high-resolution map materials together with competent partners. A current example of the potential of this data is the predictive efficiency assistant in the new Audi Q7*. It utilizes information about the topography to get the car to its destination with greater efficiency and convenience. High-resolution maps will also play a key role in piloted driving.

“The importance of high-resolution, three-dimensional maps will continue to grow in the future,” explains Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, Audi Head of Development, and he refers to piloted driving as a typical application: “Here we primarily use the data in situations in which a precise prediction is crucial – e.g. data on expressway interchanges, road splits and entrance and exit ramps.” Audi is working on the navigation map of the future with strategic partners such as Dutch map and navigation supplier TomTom – utilizing various technology platforms in the process. The next generation of the Audi A8 will be a front-runner in piloted driving technology and the use of high-resolution maps.

Today, Audi customers can already realize significant benefits from precise map materials. The predictive efficiency assistant in the new Audi Q7* already utilizes highly precise route data that includes information on elevation profiles – it works with this data even while the driver is not actively using navigation. If desired, the system can also be used to help economize on fuel. It offers practical fuel-saving tips to drivers in situations in which reducing speed makes sense.

The predictive efficiency assistant recognizes curves, roundabouts and intersections, descents and ascents, as well as municipality border signs and speed limit signs – often before the driver even sees them. Drivers who fully utilize this features can reduce fuel consumption by up to ten percent.

Fuel consumption of the models named above:

Audi Q7:
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 8.3 – 5.7**;
Combined CO2-emissions in g/km: 183 – 149**

**The fuel consumption and the CO2 emissions of a vehicle vary due to the choice of wheels and tires. They not only depend on the efficient utilization of the fuel by the vehicle, but are also influenced by driving behavior and other non-technical factors.

Source: Audi

The new VW Passat features the latest in-car technologies

Volkswagen has unveiled the all-new Passat at a ceremony at the Volkswagen Design Centre in Potsdam, Germany.  The latest car, which will receive its public premiere at the Paris Motor Show in October, is the eighth-generation of the Passat, which over the past 41 years has racked up over 23 million sales worldwide.

VW

Everything in this car is new: its design, technologies and engines.  The Passat sets new standards with an unladen weight that has been reduced by up to 85 kg and fuel economy figures that have been improved by up to 20 per cent.  For the first time, there will also be a Passat with a plug-in hybrid drive system.  In its design and in the advanced features it offers, the new Passat bridges the gap between the upper medium and premium class.

At 4,767 mm long, the saloon is two millimetres shorter than the previous model, while the wheelbase is 79 mm longer at 2,791 mm and therefore the body overhangs significantly shorter. At the same time, the Passat is 14 mm lower at 1,456 mm, and 12 mm wider at 1,832 mm.

Because of the optimised engine orientation, it was possible to lower significantly the bonnet and shift the windscreen towards the rear. This ‘cab backward design’ helps to create the impression of a premium-class car.  Extremely precisely drawn edges and creases which develop individual light-reflecting surfaces help to continue this impression.  At the front, the new Passat’s radiator grille features four chrome bars which bend inward towards the headlights in a trapezoidal shape.  The lowermost chrome bar of the grille is continued into the headlights.

Immediately noticeable at the rear is that the cab has a strong inward sweep, and at the bottom it transitions into the wide, flared shoulder section.  The rear lights have been made considerably wider and leaner.  In this area, the Saloon looks like a young sibling of the Phaeton with its large bootlid surface, and a distinctive crease beneath the rear lights that extends across the rear.

All models of Passat have LED rear lights, while the higher-specification versions feature a distinctive horizontal tail light signature that switches over to a vertically oriented brake light signature under braking.  Headlights are halogen or LED.  In conjunction with Dynamic Light Assist, one of the two LED headlight options automatically adjusts the beam for maximum illumination of the road without dazzling other traffic.

Despite exterior dimensions that are actually marginally smaller than those of the previous Passat, interior space is improved, with more leg- and head-room, as well as increased luggage space.

The interior has been developed to match the sophisticated exterior of the eighth-generation Passat.  New technologies to be offered on the new Passat include the optional Active Info Display, which replaces the instrument cluster with a fully configurable interactive 12.3-inch TFT display; a heads-up display; the latest Modular Infotainment System, including the
Car-Net remote app; a further-developed 360-degree Area View function; and the latest generation of Park Assist.  This newly developed Park Assist includes the option for the car to park itself forwards into perpendicular spaces – useful, for example at supermarket car parks, where access to the boot is important.  It also includes a world-first Trailer Assist system, which provides assistance when reversing a vehicle with a trailer attached – without the need for any modification or adaptation of the trailer.

Safety technology includes Side Assist with Rear Traffic Alert; Traffic Jam Assist which makes stop-and-go driving more comfortable; Emergency Assist, which can potentially halt a vehicle when the driver is incapacitated; and the latest Front Assist system with City Emergency Braking, which optionally combines both radar and camera sensors to add pedestrian detection.

A highlight of the Passat’s new range of engines is a high-performance, four-cylinder, 2.0-litre, bi-turbo diesel delivering 240 PS and an extraordinary 500 Nm from 1,750 rpm.  This engine will be available only with a new seven-speed DSG gearbox and 4MOTION
all-wheel drive.  A plug-in hybrid model will also be offered, with potential to travel 31 miles on battery power alone, and with a maximum range of around 600 miles.

Source: VW

Bosch predicts ADAS market will reach Euro 1 billion by 2016

In the coming years, the automobile will undergo major changes. “The traffic of the future is electric, automated, and connected,” said Dr. Volkmar Denner, the chairman of the Bosch board of management, during his presentation at “Automotive and Engine Technology,” the 14th Stuttgart International Symposium. “Automated driving can drastically reduce the number of accidents, and thus significantly increase road safety,” Denner said. “Moreover, a better flow of traffic also reduces fuel consumption.” Today, assistance functions are already assuming a broad range of driving functions. In the future, even higher-performance systems will provide drivers with increasingly comprehensive support, and gradually pave the way for fully automated driving.

The Bosch CEO highlighted the benefits of automated driving, and set out the challenges that still need to be solved. “The prospect of saving 1.2 million lives is a great source of motivation,” Denner said, in reference to the estimated number of road traffic deaths around the world each year. In Germany, almost 90 percent of all traffic accidents are caused by drivers. Here, comprehensive support in critical situations as well as in monotonous driving situations could significantly increase road safety. But more than that, automated driving is also economical. By drawing on up-to-the-minute traffic data, it can improve the flow of traffic and thus decrease the fuel consumption of every vehicle. And last, but not least: “Automated driving also keeps senior citizens mobile, and thus makes a contribution to social well-being,” Denner said.

Automated driving will come gradually

For more than ten years, adaptive cruise control has automatically controlled speed, as well as distance to vehicles ahead. The traffic jam assistant, which keeps vehicles travelling at speeds up to 60 kph in their lanes, is now being brought to market. This support for drivers will gradually be extended. “By 2020 at the latest, the technologies required for highly-automated driving will reach maturity. In the decade that follows, we expect to see fully-automated driving,” Denner said. While drivers in highly automated vehicles must take control of the vehicles after a short time, fully automated driving will allow them to sit back and let the car do the work, at least on freeways. And Bosch will be automating parking even sooner. Bosch technology will soon be easing cars into free parking spots autonomously via a smart phone app. In a few years, cars will even be able to find spots on their own in parking garages.

While technical limitations mean that the pace of development is gradual, this does have its advantages. “It gives drivers the time to gradually grasp the benefits of the new technology,” Denner said. Today’s drivers already show openness to these innovations. A Bosch survey in six European countries showed that 59 percent of respondents considered automated driving to be a good thing. However, they wanted to be able to actively switch it off. In purely economic terms, the market for driver assistance technologies is already an attractive one with excellent growth prospects. “By 2016, Bosch will be generating one billion euros in sales with driver assistance systems,” Denner said.

The Bosch “Automated Driving” project team was formed in 2011, and has since been working in Stuttgart and Palo Alto on the future of driving. And at the start of 2013, Bosch was the first automotive supplier to bring its automated driving technologies to German freeways. “The early tests in real traffic conditions have significantly sped up the development process,” Denner said.

Automated driving requires broad systems expertise

In the coming years, Bosch engineers still have a broad range of tasks ahead of them, as automated driving has an impact on all vehicle systems. “Only automakers and suppliers with broad systems expertise will succeed,” Denner said. The Bosch CEO summarized the five main development priorities as follows:

Sensor concepts for 360° environment recognition:

What types of sensor technologies are needed to capture the vehicle’s surroundings well enough to recommend the right actions? Bosch has already sold more than a million radar and video sensors. The company is drawing on this experience to develop high-performance yet economical environment recognition technology that will satisfy the demands of automated driving.

Redundant system architecture:

To maintain maximum availability in the event that one component fails, there will be a change in vehicle architecture. Bosch has already come up with the required redundancy for brakes, for instance. The iBooster electromechanical brake booster and the ESP system can bring the vehicle to a stop autonomously, independently of one another.

Reliability in the event of malfunction and hacking:

To check functional reliability, Bosch applies high-performance methods. However, the subsequent validation calls for new approaches if the effort of validating an autopilot system is to be kept at today’s level. Using the methods applied today, more than 250 million test kilometers would have to be driven. To protect vehicle systems from hacking, Bosch already relies on a dual architecture that keeps the infotainment features in the automotive electrical system separate from the systems required for driving. In addition, the electronics expert offers complementary hard- and software-based solutions for data security and access protection. “The automotive industry needs clear, consistent data-protection and data-security regulations,” Denner said.

High-precision map data:

While accuracy to the nearest meter is more than sufficient for current navigation systems, this is not sufficient for fully automated driving. For the latter, accuracy to the nearest ten centimeters are required. Moreover, the maps must be completely up to date to ensure that the vehicle can anticipate the correct route and stay on course.

Legal regulations:

According to the Vienna Convention of 1968, which serves as the basis for legislation in many countries around the world, only partly automated driving is legal. “Authorization regimes and questions related to product liability are currently the subject of intense debate among associations, governments, and insurance companies,” Denner said.

Connected vehicles are safer, more efficient, and more comfortable

Even if vehicle connectivity is not required for automated driving, it does make it safer and more efficient. A connection to the internet can provide cars with up-to-the-minute data on traffic and construction zones. It can even deliver traffic sign-related information that other vehicles have recorded. This makes it possible to optimize the navigation system’s routing. What is more, communication between vehicles enables timely warnings of potential hazards, such as the tail of a traffic jam or an approaching rescue vehicle. Vehicle connectivity will also give rise to new services, for instance when data is exchanged with monitoring centers, insurance companies, or fleet operators. The Bosch Communication Center business unit’s eCall solutions already feature in a number of automakers models. And with LeasePlan, Bosch Software Innovations, a Bosch subsidiary, is planning an entirely new fleet management concept. “In the future, connected features will be a fundamental part of the vehicle architecture, and they will make driving more comfortable, more efficient, and safer,” Denner said.

Source: Bosch