Georgia lab takes autonomous vehicle infrastructure testing to the streets

The newly opened Infrastructure-Automotive Technology Laboratory (iATL) in Alpharetta, Georgia, provides a hub for automakers, cellular network operators, traffic control device companies and semiconductor manufacturers to create, develop and test connected vehicle safety applications in real-world conditions.

The 4,400-square-foot facility includes dozens of different types of electronic devices that control everything from traffic signals and school zone safety beacons to electronic crosswalks. Automakers will be able to develop safety apps that interact with the devices and cellular network operators will work out communications, including 5G.

Real-world conditions

Through the iATL, automakers can test safety applications in the streets of Alpharetta, which operates the first large-scale deployment of connected vehicle infrastructure technology using all forms of communications simultaneously – 4G LTE, Cellular Vehicle to Everything (C-V2X), Dedicated Short Range Radio (DSRC) and 900 MHz radio, underwritten by the North Fulton Community Improvement District.

“The iATL is not just a collection of traffic devices in a laboratory, but it is embedded in an ecosystem of 125 connected intersections to test the day-one applications in real-world conditions”

“The iATL is where automakers, roadway operators and technology companies can come together and make the vision of connected vehicles a reality now,” said Bryan Mulligan, president of Applied Information Inc. “The iATL is not just a collection of traffic devices in a laboratory, but it is embedded in an ecosystem of 125 connected intersections to test the day-one applications in real-world conditions.”

 

 

The rubber hits the road

The opening day began with a workshop outlining policy and plans for connecting smart cars to a smart infrastructure and was attended by government leaders, roadway operators and representatives of the automotive, cellular network and technology industries.

“The iATL is a prime example of Georgia’s leadership in developing critical technology that is so important to our state and national economies while at the same time improving the safety of all of us who use our streets and highways today,” said Georgia Lt Gov. Geoff Duncan. “I am particularly pleased that this incredible facility is privately sponsored and enjoys the overwhelming support of the local government and surrounding business community – where the rubber meets the road.”

“The ability of vehicles to communicate with the traffic control infrastructure is crucial to improving roadway safety and for the rapid adoption of connected vehicle technology across the fleet,” added Jovan Zagajac, head of connected vehicle technology for Ford Motor Company.

Source: Sarah Wray. Smart Cities World

Autonomous Air Taxi trialed in North Carolina

EHang Conducts First-Ever U.S. Trial Flight of Pilotless Air Taxi at North Carolina Transportation Summit

EHang  the world’s leading autonomous aerial vehicle (AAV) technology platform company, today conducted its first-ever U.S. trial flight of its two-seater passenger-grade AAV, the EHang 216, as part of the North Carolina Transportation Summit hosted by the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) on January 8 and 9, 2020.

First-ever U.S. trial flight of EHang 216

This represents the first time that the EHang 216 has received flight approval from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). While this was a non-passenger flight, EHang is working with the FAA to secure approval for a passenger trial flight of the EHang 216 in the near future.

FAA为亿航智能颁发飞行许可.jpg

FAA issues flight approval for EHang

“Our mission is to make safe, autonomous, and eco-friendly air mobility accessible to everyone and this trial flight represents a significant step towards bringing our urban air mobility solutions to the U.S. market,” said EHang founder, chairman, and CEO Huazhi Hu. “Pilotless air taxis have the power to transform everyday life in urban areas since they can lessen pollution, expedite emergency services, and save individuals and businesses time and money through shorter travel times.”

Roy Cooper, the North Carolina Governor, said, “We are proud to have the first autonomous aerial vehicle flying in North America, in North Carolina. Obviously, they are beginning this all of the world and this technology and what it means for transportation, both cargo and passengers, is pretty astronomical. This gonna be very positive for the economy. We want North Carolina to be on the cutting edge of this technology and we’re proud to have EHang here to show and demonstrate to us what can be done with this technology. It’s taking off. We North Carolina has become the pilot that can help move this kind of business forward. We are excited about that.”

Pearlis Johnson, Deputy Regional Administrator, Southern Region, FAA

Derrick Xiong,Co-founder & CMO of EHang

James H. Trogdon III,Transportation Secretary

David Howard,Chief Deputy Secretary

Mr. Roy Cooper, Governor of North Carolina

To date, EHang has safely conducted over two thousand trial flights in the United States, China, Austria, the Netherlands, Qatar, and the UAE to ensure that its AAVs operate safely and reliably in different areas globally.

EHang is the first UAM company to realize commercialization for its passenger-grade AAVs, having already delivered 38 units to customers as of December 5, 2019.

 

Prior to this debut flight in the U.S., two EHang 216 AAVs completed simultaneous trial flights of their commercial sightseeing applications in Guangzhou, China on November 30, 2019. These trial flights are part of EHang’s joint initiative with the government of Guangzhou to develop Guangzhou to be EHang’s first urban air mobility pilot city. These trial flights will enable EHang to test flight routes and vertiports to implement the initiative.

 

In January 2019, EHang was selected by the Civil Aviation Administration of China as the country’s first and only pilot company for passenger-grade AAV operation programs. In May 2019, EHang launched trial operations of urban air cargo transportation in collaboration with the express delivery company DHL-Sinotrans along a customized flight route of approximately 5 miles (8km) in Donguan, China.

 

EHang has three main business pillars: urban air mobility (including passenger transportation and logistics), smart city management, and aerial media. These pillars are underpinned by a comprehensive suite of operational service support for AAV customers including training, maintenance, command-and-control system set-up, and flight monitoring.

Source: E-Hang.

Toyota to build Woven City prototype Smart City of the future

20200107_01_01-1000x525Toyota has revealed plans to build Woven-City a prototype “city” of the future on a 175-acre site at the base of Mount Fuji in Japan. Announced at CES 2020, the global consumer technology show in Las Vegas, the Woven City will be a fully connected ecosystem, powered by hydrogen fuel cells.

 Envisioned as a “living laboratory,” the city will be home to full-time residents and researchers who will be able to test and develop technologies such as autonomy, robotics, personal mobility, smart homes and artificial intelligence in a real-world environment.

 Akio Toyoda, Toyota Motor Corporation President, said: “Building a complete city from the ground up, even on a small scale like this, is a unique opportunity to develop future technologies, including a digital operating system for the infrastructure. With people, buildings and vehicles all connected and communicating with each other through data and sensors, we will be able to test connected AI technology, in both the virtual and physical realms, maximising its potential.”

 Toyota will extend an open invitation to collaborate to other commercial and academic partners and invite interested scientists and researchers from around the world to come and work on their projects in this one-of-a-kind, real-world incubator.

 “We welcome all those inspired to improve the way we live in the future to take advantage of his unique research ecosystem and join us in our quest to create an ever-better way of life and mobility for all,” said Akio Toyoda.

Toyota has commissioned Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, Founder and Creative Director of Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), to design Woven City. His team has designed many high-profile projects, from 2 World Trade Center in New York and Lego House in Denmark, to Google’s Mountain View and London headquarters.

 Design of the city

Under the city’s masterplan, street use has three designations: for faster vehicles only; for a mix of lower-speed vehicles, personal mobility and pedestrians; and for pedestrians only (a park-like promenade). These three street types will weave together in an organic grid pattern to help accelerate the testing of autonomous transport.

 The city is planned to be fully sustainable, with buildings made mostly of wood using traditional Japanese joinery and robotised production methods, to minimise the carbon footprint. The roofs will be covered in photo-voltaic panels to generate solar power, adding to the energy produced by hydrogen fuel cells. Toyota also plans to weave in the natural world throughout the city, with native vegetation and hydroponics.

 Residential buildings will be equipped with the latest human support technologies, such as in-home robotics to assist with daily living. Homes will use sensor-based AI to check the occupants’ health, take care of basic needs and enhance daily life. The project will be an opportunity to deploy connected technology with integrity and trust, securely and positively.

 Only fully autonomous, zero-emission vehicles will be allowed on the main thoroughfares to move residents around. Throughout the city, autonomous Toyota e-Palette vehicles will be used for transport and deliveries, and as changeable mobile retail units.

 Neighbourhood parks, a large central recreation area and a central plaza for social gatherings will be designed to bring the community together. Toyota believes that encouraging human connection will be an equally important aspect of the Woven City experience.

 Toyota plans to populate Woven City with employees and their families, retired couples, retailers, visiting scientists and industry partners. The plan is to start with 2,000 people and increase the number as the city evolves.

Ground-breaking for the site is scheduled for early 2021. Those interested in partnering with the project can find more details at Woven-city.global.

 Source: Toyota

 

Tim Cosgrove wins the Co-Star table football final

The 2019 Co-Star table football contest sponsored by Terry’s Chocolate Orange was won by Tim Cosgrove in an intense and pulsating grand final.

 Matt Hancock and Tim Cosgrove contested the final for the forth year in a row qualifying as group winners.

 Tim was representing Leeds United and Matt was playing on behalf off their very bitter rivals Manchester United.

 The final was keenly contested with both players on top of their games, Matt was dominant in midfield but Tim had the edge in defence and attack.

 Tim commented ” Contests between myself and Matt are always incredibily close and very keenly contested and I’m delighted to retain the trophy and getting one over on Man united makes it even sweeter! Hopefully this is a good omen for Leeds United too as they chase promotion back to the premier league”.

A hugely dissapointed Matt refused to comment.

 The final league was:

 1.Tim Cosgrove

2.Matt Hancock

3.Owen Berger

4.Laura Cosgrove

5.Vicky Grazulyte

6.Trudy Newby

Source: Co-Star

World’s first hydrogen bus fleet rolls out in France

 
The hydrogen bus will operate in the French city of Pau. Picture copyright: Cyril Garrabos

The hydrogen bus will operate in the French city of Pau. Picture copyright: Cyril Garrabos

The world’s first hydrogen-powered bus rapid transit (BRT) system has been deployed in the city of Pau in the south of France.

Dubbed Fébus, the new service will see eight 18-metre long Van Hool buses operate on a 6km dedicated line in the centre of Pau.

Project launch

French public transport operator, Keolis, has worked in partnership with local transport operator Société de Transport de l’Agglomération Paloise on the project launch and is providing technical assistance for the operation of the eight hydrogen BRTs.

This new service is part of a major upgrade to the city public transport system.

With 85 per cent of the 6km route running in dedicated lanes protected from other traffic, and a priority system operating at intersections, journey time is limited to 17 minutes.

Built by the Belgian manufacturer Van Hool, the buses produce their electricity on board, using a hydrogen fuel cell.

“The use of this technology results in zero emission of greenhouse gases or air polluting substances.“

The bus’ power source is an electric hybrid. Hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) are converted to electricity in the fuel cell using electrolysis in “real-time”. Further, the lithium batteries and electric motors provide additional power wherever and whenever it is needed.

The energy that is released when the vehicle’s brakes are applied is also re-used. The use of this technology means there are no emissions of greenhouse gases or air polluting substances, claims Van Hool – the vehicle’s only emission is water vapour.

The buses are designed to be accessible for people with reduced mobility, can accommodate 145 riders and feature large bay windows that provide passengers with plenty of light.

The line’s 14 stations are equipped with real-time passenger information, free wi-fi, automatic ticket vending machines and video protection cameras.

The buses operate on the route between François Mitterand Hospital, in the north of the intercommunal area, and Pau train station, in the south. They serve the city’s main points of activity: educational (the university); and administrative as well as commercial and leisure hubs (supermarket, cinema, restaurants, city centre and its shops).

In France, in addition to the hydrogen BRT service in Pau, Keolis launched the fully electric BRT lines in Amiens (May 2019) and Bayonne-Biarritz-Anglet (September 2019) as well as the Caen steel-wheeled tram (July 2019).

In the Netherlands, in September 2019, Keolis won the largest electric bus contract in its history, with 300 vehicles operating in the provinces of Overijssel, Flevoland and Gelderland from December 2020 onwards.

Source: Smart Cities News

CLASS software framework makes Modena smarter in real-life setting

Cutting-edge software technology developed by the European project CLASS is now being tested on connected cars in the Modena Automotive Smart Area (MASA), a real urban laboratory in northern Italy. The CLASS framework is powering compelling smart city applications, from digital traffic signs and smart parking to air pollution simulation and pedestrian avoidance applications.

Allowing the execution of big-data analytics under real-time constraints, the CLASS software architecture provides a solution to the problems of managing extremely large amounts of complex data (pedestrians, traffic, vehicles, etc.) in real time. Data-in-motion and data-at-rest analytics are integrated into a single development framework, which works with real-time guarantees.

“It’s thrilling to see our technology powering the smart city use cases which will make our urban areas safer and less congested,” said Eduardo Quiñones, senior researcher at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) and coordinator of the CLASS project. “Thanks to its capacity to process big data analytics under real-time constraints, the CLASS framework is a significant step towards making safe connected vehicles a reality.”

“With the MASA, the city of Modena is combining the proud Italian tradition of high-end cars with the needs of modern smart cities,” said Luca Chiantore, manager of the department of Smart city, demographic services and participation of the Modena City Council. “We are delighted to be testing out the most innovative smart-city technologies, paving the way towards a truly responsive urban area which will improve quality of life for all citizens.”

The first outcomes of this smart city use case resulted in different applications, which will improve the traffic and pollution conditions of modern urban environments.

All the software architecture components have been defined and are available to download on the dedicated CLASS GitHub channel: https://github.com/class-euproject

Demonstration of moving vehicles and pedestrians in real-time in the MASA area

A real smart city use case in Modena

The CLASS software is being evaluated in the Modena Automotive Smart Area (MASA), a real urban laboratory in the city of Modena. Data is already being generated and collected from IoT devices and sensors located in the MASA and on the high-tech equipped Maserati cars.

Initial tests started generating a knowledge base with combined information of the city and the cars, upon which the following advanced smart city applications are being implemented:

  • The Digital traffic sign application allows for evaluating and improving real-time traffic conditions by advising on best routes available, for instance in the case of accidents or emergency vehicles.
  • The Air pollution simulation estimates the pollution emissions of the moving vehicles in real-time.
  • The Smart parking gathers and provides real-time data on the available parking lots within the area.
  • The Obstacle detection warns the drivers about pedestrians and objects that appear on their way, even if it is not visible to the car.

CLASS vehicle detecting parking space

About CLASS

CLASS (Edge and Cloud Computation: A Highly Distributed Software for Big Data Analytics) is a European funded project with a budget of €3.9 million which started on 1 January 2018 and ends on 31 December 2020. Coordinated by Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC, Spain), the project brings together a multidisciplinary consortium composed by all stakeholders needed for the development of business innovations using real big-data including vendors from the ICT industry such as Atos Spain S.A. (Spain) and IBM Israel, users across different smart city domain sectors including private and public organizations such as the Comune di Modena (Italy) and Maserati SPA (Italy) and researchers such as the Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia (UNIMORE, Italy). Further information can be found on the project website: www.class-project.eu.

 

How Ford Is Exploring the Quantum World with Microsoft to Help Reduce Congestion

Our connected world has helped billions of people improve their lives in numerous ways such as offering instant access to information, enhancing health care, providing new ways to watch movies or experience music, and equipping our homes with smart speakers.

Yet with all these advancements, many of us find ourselves stuck in more traffic, not less. The fantastic navigation technology that anyone can use and helps us more efficiently get places simply does not have the power to coordinate traffic on a mass scale.

But could it? Through a joint research pilot, Ford and Microsoft scientists have simulated thousands of vehicles and their impact on congestion by leveraging powerful quantum-inspired technology. While we’re still in the early stages of quantum computing development, encouraging progress has been made that can help us take what we’ve learned in the field and start to apply it to problems we want to solve today, while scaling to more complex problems tomorrow.

Julie Love, senior director at Microsoft leading their quantum computing business development, says, “Quantum computing has the potential to transform the auto industry and the way we move. To do that we need to have a deep understanding of the problems that companies like Ford want to solve, which is why collaborations like these are so important.”

Our researchers teamed up in 2018 to develop new quantum approaches running on classical computers already available to help reduce Seattle’s traffic congestion.

During rush hour driving, numerous drivers request the shortest possible routes at the same time, but current navigation services handle these requests in a vacuum. They do not take into consideration the number of similar incoming requests, including areas where other drivers are all planning to share the same route segments, when delivering results.

Just imagine a family trying to get ready for work and school in the morning with similar departure times. If an individual day planning app gave each person the quickest way to get going, there likely would be a bottle-neck at the bathroom. Now scale that to a family of thousands…

Instead of this type of individualized routing, what if we could develop a more balanced routing system — one that could consider all the various route requests from drivers and optimize route suggestions so that the number of vehicles sharing the same roads is minimized? That sounds great — and could potentially save everyone time, not to mention aggravation — but one major roadblock towards balanced routing is the fact that it would require extensive computational resources.

Simply put, it’s not feasible to have traditional computers find the optimal solution from a huge number of possible route assignments in a timely manner. That’s where quantum computing can help. Essentially, existing digital computers translate information into either a 1 or a 0, otherwise known as a bit. But in a quantum computer, information can be processed by a quantum bit (or a qubit) that can simultaneously exist in two different states before it gets measured. Upon measurement, however, either a 1 or a 0 appears randomly and the probability for each is governed by a set of rules called quantum mechanics.

This ultimately enables a quantum computer to process information with a faster speed. Attempts to simulate some specific features of a quantum computer on non-quantum hardware have led to quantum-inspired technology — powerful algorithms that mimic certain quantum behaviors and run on specialized conventional hardware. That enables organizations to start realizing some benefits before fully-scaled quantum hardware becomes available.

With the ability to process vast amounts of data that’s not possible today. It’s easier to imagine how quantum computing has the potential to deliver balanced routing to drivers, which could create a series of cascading benefits: smoother flow of traffic, more efficient commutes, and even reduced pollution.

Additional thoughts from Julie: “By taking what we’ve learned about quantum computing and bringing it to hardware that’s already available, we don’t have to wait until quantum computers are deployed on a wide scale to take advantage of the technology. Using world-class quantum algorithms customized for specific problems, we can bring measurable improvements and drive change that can impact people’s lives.”

Working with Microsoft, we tested several different possibilities, including a scenario involving as many as 5,000 vehicles — each with 10 different route choices available to them — simultaneously requesting routes across Metro Seattle. In 20 seconds, balanced routing suggestions were delivered to the vehicles that resulted in a 73 percent improvement in total congestion when compared to “selfish” routing. The average commuting time, meanwhile, was also reduced by 8 percent — an annual reduction of more than 55,000 hours saved in congestion across this simulated fleet.

 

These results are promising, so now we’re expanding our partnership with Microsoft to further improve the algorithm and understand its effectiveness in more real-world scenarios. For example, will this method still deliver similar results when some streets are known to be closed, if route options aren’t equal for all drivers, or if some drivers decide to not follow suggested routes? These and more are all variables we’ll need to test for to ensure balanced routing can truly deliver tangible improvements for cities.

Our collaboration with NASA last year also involved similar work around a routing efficiency problem for fleet vehicles, but our growing quantum computing team is working with Microsoft and others to investigate how this technology can be used in areas ranging from robotics to aerodynamics, as Ford continues to seek out ways to create better products and experiences for people.

This work with Microsoft is another example of how we are dedicated to finding innovative solutions for problems our cities face. Our recently unveiled City Insights Platform uses data and advanced software tools to enable cities to explore and help solve a variety of mobility issues. By leveraging parking, transit, traffic, safety and census data, City Insights Platform lets local planners test various concepts even before implementing them in the real world.

The scenario we explored with Microsoft is just one way that quantum-inspired solutions could be of interest to cities. Since we know how a quantum computer would attempt to solve a problem like this, we’ve reached a point where we can apply our knowledge to address near-term issues with hardware that we already have. That puts the future much closer to our grasp than many may have initially thought — and we are intent on seizing the opportunity.

Source: Dr. Ken Washington, Chief Technology Officer, Ford Motor Company

Swiss waste company uses telematics technology

globalserv2
Helvetia Environnement will use Rubicon’s platform of both in-vehicle and fleet management dashboard technology to uncover cost savings.
Waste management company Helvetia Environnement has signed a subscription agreement to use Rubicon’s cloud-based waste, recycling and smart city solutions.
 
Helvetia Environnement provides waste collection, management and recycling services in Switzerland. As part of its circular economy mandate, the company also generates energy from waste.
Rubicon’s technology features a number of components that work together to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of municipal refuse collection services, while also gathering and analysing data to inform public policy development and government operations.
The new partnership will allow Helvetia Environnement to use Rubicon’s platform of both in-vehicle and fleet management dashboard technology to help uncover cost savings, divert waste and improve operations through data analytics.
 
The company said it is committed to providing sustainable solutions to its network of approximately 500 public sector and 15,000 private sector clients.
 
“Helvetia Environnement is committed to bringing innovative sustainability solutions and best-in-class technology to its growing customer base,” said Vincent Chapel, CEO at Helvetia Environnement.
 
“We are excited to see Rubicon’s technology allow us to digitise our logistics and administrative processes for our key account customers.”
“Helvetia Environnement is the most forward-thinking environmental company in Switzerland; we are excited to deploy Rubicon’s technology with such a sophisticated company,” added Renaud de Viel Castel, senior vice president of global expansion at Rubicon.
“Partnering with Helvetia through our SaaS solution will allow us to accompany Helvetia Environnement on [its] path to growth.”
 
Source: Rubicon

The search begins for the Microlise driver of the year 2020

lorry-driver-agency

Microlise have launched the hunt for the UK’s best truck driver. Now in its sixth year, this popular award initiative shortlists drivers by analysing a year’s worth of Microlise telematics performance data to reveal the most talented short, medium and long distance drivers. The coveted top slot of Driver of the Year will formally be announced at the Microlise Transport Conference on 20th May 2020.

The awards process begins with the Microlise Data Science team, who will analyse in excess of 225,000 drivers’ telematics records from 2019. Data will be anonymised with company, contract and driver personal identification information removed. In this way, the process, which was initially developed in conjunction with The University of Nottingham’s Advanced Data Analytics Centre, will identify the best performing drivers.

Five additional nomination-based categories – Young Driver, Most Improved, Lifetime Achievement, HGV Hero and Extra Mile are also open to the entire HGV community, regardless of whether Microlise telematics technology is used. Drivers and transport managers are invited to nominate their colleagues, employers are then asked to support the nomination and provide further qualitative evidence that may result in a driver being named as a winner.

An independent panel of industry experts will shortlist three drivers in each category and oversee the awards process. Chief Executive of the Road Haulage Association, Richard Burnett, Editor of Motor Transport, Steve Hobson, and retired Traffic Commissioner for Scotland, Joan Aitken will be among this year’s judges.

Shortlisted drivers across all categories will win a track day and will be guests at a special awards evening prior to the Microlise Transport Conference on 20 May. The Microlise Driver of the Year will receive their award at the Conference itself in front of a packed house of over 1,200 delegates.

“These are the most comprehensive awards for drivers of heavy commercial vehicles. Our data science team uses the latest technology to evaluate data from hundreds of thousands of anonymous drivers, to help us to understand who is the country’s best driver,” said Bob Harbey, Executive Director at Microlise. “This is one of our favourite projects in the year as it allows us to recognise and celebrate the tremendous contribution drivers make to the transport industry and to our economy as a whole.”

Bibby Distribution driver, Mark Field, beat off stiff competition in 2019 to win the Microlise Driver of the Year Award and also won the short distance category, featuring drivers who regularly undertake journeys of up to 30,000 miles each year.

Nominations can be made at the Microlise Driver of the Year Award website on or before 14 February 2020.

Source: Microlise

The World’s first NB-IoT leak logger launched on World Water Loss Day

ZONESCAN NB-IoT is the world’s first NB-IoT leak logger. It was officially launched on 4th December 2019, on the first World Water Loss Day which was initiated by Gutermann and the IWA Water Loss Specialist Group and endorsed by the large industry associations IWA and AWWA.

  

NB-IoT is a new cellular communication standard optimised for machine-to-machine data communication in smart cities. NB-IoT significantly outperforms conventional 3G and 4G technology, as it consumes 5-10x less power and has significantly improved underground coverage. Telecom operators worldwide have announced plans for complete NB-IoT coverage and are in the process of activating their NB-IoT antennas throughout their networks.

 The ZONESCAN NB-IoT logger is GUTERMANN’s first cellular logger and complements Gutermann’s RF-based ZONESCAN ALPHA system which has established itself as the leading fixed network technology and is used in over 300 cities around the world. ZONESCAN NB-IoT is a correlating system which means that the cloud-based ZONESCAN NET software automatically compares the data of all neighbouring sensors every day to identify even quiet leaks whose existence are not recognised by individual loggers.

 A Correlation Indicator provides information about the area in which the leak has been identified, neatly displayed on a Google Maps™ enabled user interface. ZONESCAN NET also lets users see and manage their leak detection infrastructure, perform advanced leak analysis, import and display their GIS data, and change settings such as recording times, alarm thresholds and more.

Lucas Grolimund, CEO of Gutermann said: “We are excited about the launch of this product because we see an enormous potential for it given the connectivity and power properties of the NB-IoT technology. We’re happy to once more lead the way in advanced fixed network leak monitoring solutions. Our hope is that the ZONESCAN NB-IoT logger will make permanent monitoring of networks more accessible to utilities due to its cost, ease of installation and compact design. It should therefore contribute to the rapid growth of technology-enabled smart water networks, helping to consistently reduce and maintain lower water loss levels.”

 Source: Guttermann